Our Do'ers Profile

Policy & Practice, September 2006 | Go to article overview

Our Do'ers Profile


In Our Do'ers Profile, we highlight some of the hardworking and talented individuals in public human services. This issue features Lucy Hadi of Florida's Department of Children and Families.

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Name: Lucy D. Hadi

Title: Secretary

Years of Service: 33 years in public service, 22 months in current position

Rewards of the Job: It is very rewarding to work with a group of human service professionals who are dedicated to making a positive impact on the lives of our customers. My greatest satisfaction comes from seeing results from innovations and improvements created by DCF team members who are committed to improving the quality of our services every day.

Accomplishments Most Proud of: As DCF secretary, I am proud of improved outcomes for children in our child welfare system, particularly a dramatic increase in adoptions, reduction in the number of children in out-of-home care, achievement of nearly 99 percent in monthly child visitation and commencement of 99 percent of child protective investigation within 24 hours. These improvements have been accomplished through strong partnerships with community-based care agencies and with a constant focus on performance improvement.

We in Florida are also very proud of our modernized economic services system called "ACCESS" that has reduced the number of staff by 35 percent while increasing workload by more than 20 percent and improving our error rate. The ACCESS motto is "supported by technology; powered by partnerships." DCF economic service staff designed and implemented this new system during the last two years while delivering the disaster food stamp program to more than 3 million households in response to eight hurricanes. Today, more than 85 percent of all customer applications for public assistance are submitted electronically via the Internet through one of our 2,400+ partner agencies or from their homes, or at a workstation in one of our service centers.

Our latest initiative is transforming our publicly funded mental health system to a recovery-oriented customer focus from a traditional provider-centric case management model. …

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