TV Doc Gerald Is Making Home Visits; Exclusive Casualty Pin-Up Is Back .. but Now He Lives in Scotland

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), October 12, 2006 | Go to article overview

TV Doc Gerald Is Making Home Visits; Exclusive Casualty Pin-Up Is Back .. but Now He Lives in Scotland


Byline: By Rick Fulton

CASUALTY'S pin-up doctor Gerald Kyd is back on the wards ... but now he calls Scotland his home.

The 33-year-old became a household hearthrob as Dr Sean Maddox before leaving the medical drama in March 2000.

But six years later he's back this Saturday in an explosive episode which also features ex-EastEnders star Charlie Brooks as a mum whose baby has stopped breathing.

Gerald, born in South Africa to a Greek dad and Scots mum, lives in Glasgow's West End with his Scots wife Lynne Bustard, a choreographer and dance teacher.

And after many years of feeling rootless, Gerald reckons he finally found his home.

He said: "I moved to England at 14 when my parents divorced. All my life I've been searching for a place to call home.

"And I think this is my home now. I've been here for two and a half years.

"One of my best friends in London was Ian Bustard, a Glaswegian. He said: 'You'd really like my sister. You should come up and meet her. I think you guys would really get on.'

"So I came up her and met her and now we're married.

"He wanted us to get together. He thought we were kind of right, which is kind of weird."

While his mum Audrey was born in South Africa, her mother and grandmother were from Skye. Her father was a Campbell from Argyll who moved to Zimbabwe before settling in South Africa.

Gerald admitted he found the move to Scotland difficult.

"When I came here, it felt like moving to another place," he said. "It is so culturally different, even to England, but I love it now and wouldn't live anywhere else.

"It's a place of its own."

He married Lynne on a boat on Loch Lomond in 2004 and even wore a Campbell kilt. And now he's back on the UK's most popular and longest-running medical drama.

In the late Nineties, Gerald became the UK's answer to George Clooney, the womaniser ladies loved to love.

Sean Maddox was arrogant and ended up getting his girlfriend's best friend pregnant.

But he proposed to girlfriend Tina Seabrook, played by Claire Goose, in the Australian outback and left the show.

Six years later he's back, separated from Tina and angry that he doesn't see their child.

Gerald has been brought back as part of the storyline which says goodbye to Comfort Jones, played by Martina Laird, who is leaving the show after five years.

Gerald will be back in the show for six episodes as part of Casualty's 20th anniversary.

"The producers phoned me out of the blue," he revealed. "I was happy to go back. I wouldn't want to go back for too long. Since I left, I've done theatre, films and television. I get bored quickly so I need a varied career."

Gerald has worked on films such as Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life and The Defender with Dolph Lundgren.

In the summer, he starred with Ray Winstone in All In The Game and was also in the BBC's Brief Encounters.

In theatre, he played Henry Percy in Richard II and Peirs Gaveston in Edward II at Shakespeare's Globe.

He left Casualty in 2000 because he didn't want to be "part of the furniture" and get too comfortable in the role.

But now he admits he also didn't like the pin-up image and felt it was more about being sexy than being an actor.

He said: "I didn't like heartthrob tag. …

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