Hard Work and United Front Fuels Momentum to Pass the Crime Bill; Assault Weapon Ban Serves as Proof of What Working Together Can Do

By Borut, Donald J. | Nation's Cities Weekly, May 16, 1994 | Go to article overview

Hard Work and United Front Fuels Momentum to Pass the Crime Bill; Assault Weapon Ban Serves as Proof of What Working Together Can Do


Borut, Donald J., Nation's Cities Weekly


Public policy debates are a critical part of our strong democratic system. From this cauldron of verbiage can come enlighted action, and last week, it surely did -- with a modest, yet momentous step that will make our city streets safer and our communities more livable. House passage of the ban on assault weapons has virtually guaranteed that the ban will be part of any crime bill passed this year.

Thanks to the hard work of city leaders, we are one step closer to passage of meaningful anti-crime legislation. Your calls, your letters, and your personal visits to Capitol Hill made the difference: a crime bill is now within our grasp.

But we can't let up. As the crime bill heads toward a House-Senate conference, we must re-double our efforts to make sure it gets on President Clinton's desk so our nation's cities and towns can start to implement it. The assault weapons vote margin was slim--two votes--but the message is clear: by curbing the future manufacture and import of these deadly weapons, Congress is hearing the united voices of city leaders, public safety personnel, and citizens.

We want safer streets, and there is no place on those streets for deadly assault weapons which have no purpose other than to kill people. Much work remains in our efforts to curb crime and violence in our communities, but the assault weapons vote is an important first step, and a testament to what can be achieved when we speak up with a clear, resonant voice for what we belive is vital for our communities.

Remember when a similar measure was defeated by 70 votes back in 1991? I do, and it makes the accomplishment seem all the greater. Nineteen Democrats and 11 Republicans who opposed the ban three years ago switched sides last week showing that the desire to ban assault weapons and reclaim our streets can rise above traditional political concerns.

Crime threatens public health, snuffs out economic opportunity, disrupts our schools, depletes our financial resources, and paralyzes our residents with fear. That's why NLC has made figthing crime a key priority for more than three years, through ongoing work in our children and families project and policy process, advisory council studies initiated by our First Vice President Carolyn Long Banks, Atlanta coouncilwoman-at-large and NLC's Task Force on Violence, chaired Mayor Hector Luis Acevedo of San Juan, P. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hard Work and United Front Fuels Momentum to Pass the Crime Bill; Assault Weapon Ban Serves as Proof of What Working Together Can Do
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.