Web Sites Worth a Click

By Sosnowski, Carolyn J. | Information Outlook, September 2006 | Go to article overview

Web Sites Worth a Click


Sosnowski, Carolyn J., Information Outlook


DocuTicker

www.docuticker.com

The membership of our association is quite broad in character. Members work for all kinds of organizations and research a vast array of subjects. A tool we can all use, regardless of our industry, is DocuTicker, a site that offers one-stop shopping for reports issued by governments, think tanks, and other organizations. Brought to you by the team responsible for ResourceShelf, featured in the December 2004 Web Sites Worth a Click column, the site (really a blog) is updated daily and can be browsed or searched. Categories and sub-categories are applied to each entry, which includes title, link, source, and description of the report, so it's easy to find content that meets your research criteria. Topics range from technology and science to health and careers. Why dash around the Internet, visiting individual Web sites, when you can find just what you need here?

LibraryThing

www.librarything.com

Book geeks of the world unite. Discussions of LibraryThing are making their way around the Web and print, and I just had to include it here. If you haven't heard, LibraryThing is a way to catalog your books online ... and share them with others, if you are so inclined. Once you register, you can create entries for your books by pulling records from Amazon, the Library of Congress, and other libraries. Add subject "tags" to your books, and it's easy to categorize your titles and find similar ones. And, your reviews of books serve as recommendations to others. You can join groups with similar interests (almost 500 members are librarians), chat with others, and search titles, authors, tags, and users. When you've finished organizing your bookshelves at home, try LibraryThing. It's fun!

The Business of Baseball

www.businessofbaseball.com

Back in the day, the sport of baseball was just that--sport. These days, it seems to be much more a world of money and power (with the help of television and the Internet), and a lot of the commentary out there goes beyond game reportage to talk of salaries, steroids, and profitability. If that's the kind of thing you're interested in, this site is for you. Statistics abound, plus interviews, articles, and information on stadium renovations. With registration, you can access chat forums and blogs. …

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Web Sites Worth a Click
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