Making a Difference: One Person Can Change Church-State History

By Lynn, Barry W. | Church & State, October 2006 | Go to article overview

Making a Difference: One Person Can Change Church-State History


Lynn, Barry W., Church & State


I don't like to contradict people's mothers, but sometimes you just have to.

Alter I finished speaking one evening recently at a United Church of Christ in Redlands, Calif., a student from a local high school told me my stories of local activists had "inspired him." I thanked him, and he added: "See, you showed us how one person can make a difference, but my mother keeps saying one person can't."

What could I do but say: "Your morn is wrong"?

On that early September visit to California, I actually ran into a number of people who had made a very big difference in the meaning of separation of church and state.

In Redlands, I learned about an activist named Anne MacMurray who organized opposition to a ballot initiative to put a shining Latin cross back on the Redlands city seal after the American Civil Liberties Union had urged its removal in 2004. "Measure Q," as it was known, was defeated by nearly 60 percent of Redlands voters in November of 2005.

The removal of this religious symbol from display as part of an official city emblem was not accomplished by a lawsuit or by what the Religious Right likes to label "unelected black-robed tyrants." All it took was a small group of people who stood up for the separation of church and state and mobilized against the misguided measure.

The next day in Los Angeles, I met with AU members in our Guardians program as well as about 25 area activists who had attended one of our regional training seminars (which mix issue information with media training). There I got acquainted with Jeannie Parent, the new president of our San Fernando Valley Chapter.

Jeannie's predecessor, Harry Schwartzbart, was the one who contacted AU's Legal Department in January 2006 to express concern because a local high school teacher was attempting to teach a Bible-based critique of evolution in a month-long class called "Philosophy of Design."

Local parents signed on as plaintiffs, mad as you may remember, we filed a lawsuit to stop it. After a lengthy debate in the county, the school board voted to end the class early and never repeat the mistake.

Jeannie mentioned to me that she "had always taken for granted that there was a wall of separation between church and state." Like many of us, she was "shocked" when intelligent design surfaced in the California high school and "immediately got involved with Americans United." That's exactly what activist organizing is all about.

A few days before I got to California, our San Diego chapter joined with other groups to honor Phillip Paulson, a Vietnam veteran who has waged an 18year battle to have a gigantic cross removed from a mountainside national war memorial. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Making a Difference: One Person Can Change Church-State History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.