Student Writing Center for Windows

By Holzberg, Carol S. | Technology & Learning, March 1994 | Go to article overview

Student Writing Center for Windows


Holzberg, Carol S., Technology & Learning


Hardware: MS-DOS computer (2 Mb, 4 Mb recommended) with Windows 3.1 or later, DOS 3.1 or later, 386 or better processor, VGA or better display, and a hard drive with 8 Mb free space.

Emphasis: Word processing, writing.

Grade level: 4 and up.

Publisher: The Learning Company, 6493 Kaiser Drive, Fremont, CA 94555; (800) 852-2255.

School package includes: Three high-density 3.5-inch disks (low-density 3.5-inch or high-density 5.25-inch disks also available), teacher's guide, user's guide, and ready reference card.

School price: $129.95. Site licenses, lab packs, and network versions also available.

If you've recently moved up to Windows and are looking for a kid-oriented word processor that offers both power and ease of use, the Learning Company's Student Writing Center for Windows is worth a serious look. The newest entry in a word processing family that began with The Children's Writing and Publishing Center (for Apple II and MS-DOS computers) and was later joined by The Writing Center (a more sophisticated version for Macintosh users), SWC has been enhanced to take advantage of the graphical Windows environment. In addition, it includes several new features of particular interest to junior high and high school students.

Like its Macintosh cousin, this Windows tool offers click-on icons, pull-down menus, a spelling checker (with over 100,000 words), and a variety of desktop publishing features (multiple columns, sizable graphics around which text wraps automatically, flexible import capabilities, and so on) that make writing seem more like fun than work. New and improved functions include an expanded thesaurus and lots of online resources. There are an automatic bibliography maker with 20 reference formats, a title page maker, and extensive online grammar and process writing tips.

The program also offers several pre-formatted document templates to create impressive-looking reports, newsletters, journals (with optional password protection), letters, and signs. The school version includes an extensive teacher guide and a "short menus" option that lets teachers simplify the program for younger students.

Strengths

* Teachers and students will find the program's desktop publishing features--including stylistic borders around text boxes and graphics, ability to use as many as eight columns with automatic text flow, and support for multiple fonts in a variety of type sizes and styles--particularly appealing.

* The pre-formatted documents are convenient and time-saving. The menu bar at the top of the page is document-specific, providing only those choices that are relevant to the currently active document type.

* Several features make it easy for users to see where they're headed before they get there. For example, preview options let students view sample document layouts and clip art images before selecting them and completed documents before printing them out. The off-line documentation also includes thumbnail representations of all graphic clips for an "at-a-glance" overview.

* Maneuvering within or between documents is simple. It's possible to zoom in on a portion of a page or zoom out for a full-page view--and to move pictures and text boxes around in either mode. You can also have more than one document (or document type) open on the desktop, making it easy to cut, copy, or paste between open files. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Student Writing Center for Windows
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.