Documenting Migration's Revolving Door

By DeCesare, Donna | Nieman Reports, Fall 2006 | Go to article overview

Documenting Migration's Revolving Door


DeCesare, Donna, Nieman Reports


I began my journey into the world of Latino youth gangs 12 years ago on the streets of Los Angeles after covering conflicts in Central America during the 1980's. Back then, there were no gangs in Central America, but the immigrants and refugees flooding into Los Angeles, fleeing civil war and human rights abuses in their native countries, landed in poor neighborhoods where gangs were a dominant feature of youths' daily lives.

In those years California was consistently spending more on prison construction than on education. Deportation of immigrant youth offenders became a popular solution to what was then perceived as a growing "immigrant" gang problem. But the dual policies of incarceration and deportation have not rid the United States of its homegrown youth gangs. Instead prison has become a rite of passage in poor communities here, while the gang culture of Los Angeles has spread throughout Central America.

When young immigrant offenders or gang members who grew up in the United States are deported, they are denied the minimal anchors of family and "home." Some are jailed upon arrival in the countries they left as children. Most are set adrift in the shantytowns of the Americas. Rejected and feared wherever they go, they seek others like themselves for comfort, protection and survival.

It is these young men whom I have followed on their journeys from one country to another, where the common ground they find is social alienation and the comfort and security the gangs provide them. I've noticed that mine is a lonely trail, too, for as I sit and talk with these gang members about their lives, and I observe them with one another and photograph them, rarely do I come across other journalists doing the same. Thus, their story is one rarely told and rarely, it would seem, noticed, at least in these less visible aspects of their life stories that I believe can be of value for us, as Americans, to understand.

There is nothing romantic about gangs or gang violence. Postwar Guatemala and El Salvador vie with one another for the highest per capita homicide rate in the American hemisphere. Annual per capita homicide rates surpass the average annual casualty rates during the wars of the 1980's, yet in less than 20 percent of the homicide cases is anyone found guilty of the murder. Investigative work by the Guatemalan police is rare. Police officials at crime scenes commonly attribute homicides to gang vendettas of two street gangs--Mara Salvatrucha and 18th Street that originated in Los Angeles--though human rights activists with ties to the affected communities tell different stories. They speak of corrupt police, organized crime, and local vigilantes bearing some responsibility for the killings; nongovernmental organizations concerned with human rights accuse police of abuses including extra-judicial killings. …

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