Ready for VoIP? Here's How to Tell: Voice-Over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, Is One of the Fastest-Growing Technologies Being Deployed at Colleges and Universities

University Business, October 2006 | Go to article overview

Ready for VoIP? Here's How to Tell: Voice-Over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, Is One of the Fastest-Growing Technologies Being Deployed at Colleges and Universities


Bruce Grant, NEC's assistant general manager for product management and an expert on VoIP, explains this technology and how to prepare for it.

Q: VoIP "101". What is it?

A: Voice-over IP is the ability to transmit voice over your data network. In its simplest form, it's moving voice from traditional telephony standards into an IP environment.

Q: How can VoIP improve productivity for administrative staff and faculty?

A: First and foremost is providing faculty and staff with the right software applications on their PC or laptop. VoIP applications provide a multitude of communication tools ranging from presence management to inbound and outbound call logging to unified communications. Take for instance presence management; it provides faculty and staff with the ability to prioritize their communications by status, availability and caller. It provides them with control over their own communications--all calls and messages are simply and easily managed from a single application--reducing the complexity of dealing with multiple communication types and increasing personal productivity. With the addition of unified communications, they also have easy and quick access to voice, fax and email messages from a PC, telephone or the Internet--whichever is most convenient.

Another example is inbound and outbound call logging. This application provides faculty and staff with single-click call return so that if somebody calls and the call is missed the user can access the log, click the entry, and return the call. The same application also integrates with Outlook so that contacts are readily accessible for one-click dialing. It's one of NEC's many innovative call handling solutions that's currently available.

Another great application of Voice-over IP technology is the soft phone, which is turning your PC or laptop into a device that has the ability to operate as a desk phone. You could use the microphone and speakers of the PC if you wanted to, or a headset or a handset. Then you would communicate just as if you were talking on a normal phone. A soft phone gives you the ability to carry your phone anywhere you want. So if you have faculty visiting other campuses, even internationally, if they have broadband access back to the main campus, they could have telephone capability directly from their notebook computers. For all intents and purposes, to people calling them even though they may be in locales as distant as Egypt or Singapore, it would appear that they're actually back in their office on campus. Plus they'll have the full set of communications capabilities so that, should they need to check in with home or with the dean or a student, they can do that.

Q: What are the questions that IT managers at colleges and universities should be asking themselves to determine if Voice-over IP is an appropriate solution for them?

A: First, are you ready for it? Can your network infrastructure support it? Second, is there really an ROI benefit? Are you going to be able to reduce some of the costs of the traditional telephony infrastructure? Third, are you looking to have savings from a personnel standpoint? Are you going to be able to take some of your current cost structure and move those people into other departments? Fourth, do you have a need for disaster recovery, fail-over, and survivability? Fifth, do you have a desire or need to provide soft phones to faculty or administration so they can work virtually anywhere on campus or from any location with high-speed Internet access? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Ready for VoIP? Here's How to Tell: Voice-Over Internet Protocol, or VoIP, Is One of the Fastest-Growing Technologies Being Deployed at Colleges and Universities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.