When Women Meet

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), October 31, 2006 | Go to article overview

When Women Meet


Western WI: members were pleased to welcome Catherine Wild who gave an interesting and informative talk on Northumberland Tartan.

Tartan is one of Britain's oldest fabric patterns and dates from the 3rd Century.

The first raffle prizewinner this month was Hazel Hopper, Shirley Filmer won the Tartan novelty competition.

The next meeting will be on Tuesday, November 14, at 7.30pm at St Luke's Church hall, Frank Street, Wallsend.

Low Fell WI: Met at the Cricket Club on October 4 for their annual meeting, which 23 members attended.

Brenda Wilson, president, welcomed everyone. Following the business meeting everyone enjoyed a faith tea.

The raffle was drawn after tea and was won by Joyce Yates -1st prize, and Audrey Routledge - 2nd prize. The competition for a hand-made table cloth was won by Beatrice Ridley.

The next meeting is on Wednesday in the Gateshead Fell Cricket Club.

Marden WI: Members of Marden WI welcomed a very popular guest speaker Cynthia Scott to their October meeting, The subject of colour analysis and co-ordination was the main theme for the evening. Member's were impressed as Cynthia matched skin tomes to colour shades from spring through to winter, to enable everyone to make the best of what they have in their wardrobe. …

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