Marriage Beds Show Most Activity; Global Sex Survey Throws Cold Water on American Preconceptions

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 2, 2006 | Go to article overview

Marriage Beds Show Most Activity; Global Sex Survey Throws Cold Water on American Preconceptions


Byline: Jennifer Harper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Swinging singles rule? The gospel according to supermarket magazines and cheesy prime-time TV has met its match.

The world's first true study of global sexual health revealed yesterday that married people are having more sex than their single peers. Mr. and Mrs. are just fine in the bedroom, said British researchers who investigated the sexual mores of more than 1 million people in 59 countries.

Among Americans, more than 90 percent of married couples reported that they had sex in the previous month, compared with just over 50 percent among single men and women. The findings were similar in France, Britain and other industrialized nations though British and French singles fared the best in the bunch, with more than 60 percent of singles reporting some recent luck in the bedroom.

There were a few highs and lows. The least sexually active married couples were found in some African countries, with less than 50 percent reporting that they had sex recently. The most active marrieds, in order, were found in France, Kazakhstan, Rwanda, the United States, Britain and Australia.

"We did have some of our preconceptions dashed," said Kaye Wellings, a professor of sexual health at the University of London's School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She based her conclusions on an analysis of 161 medical, social science and public health studies that were completed in the past 10 years.

"Monogamy is the dominant pattern everywhere. .. Most people are married, and married people have the most sex," she wrote in the study, published in the Lancet, a British medical journal. …

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