Books: Take a Dive into Decadence; ROWAN PELLING the Decadent Handbook - for the Modern Libertine (Dedalus, Pounds 15)

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), November 5, 2006 | Go to article overview

Books: Take a Dive into Decadence; ROWAN PELLING the Decadent Handbook - for the Modern Libertine (Dedalus, Pounds 15)


Byline: by Lorne Jackson

BOOK lovers adore literature for many reasons.

The fresh seeds of inquiry it nurtures. The strong moral values it engenders.

Oh, yeah.

Then there's all that sex, drugs and rock and roll.

The literary world has always had its sleazy side - the frayed leather patch dangling from the comfy corduroy jacket of respectability.

Death and the passage of time may act as a Black & Decker Sander on the reputation of many famous authors, smoothing away their rough edges and allowing them to pose on polished plinths forged out of pious platitudes.

But there's still plenty of bad behaviour and naughty writing in the annals of English lit, if you care to hunt it down.

(Yup, book fans, I did say annals.)

The Decadent Handbook is a jaunty introduction to the world of literary wickedness.

But it's not just smut for smut's sake (more's the pity).

Instead, this is an intelligent look at the subject of decadence.

Early chapters focus on decadent theory, where the subject is analysed in a scholarly fashion.

The problem is, of course, that 'Dave Decadent' would despise such educated ramblings.

Dave doesn't articulate. What he wants is the instant gratification of a stiff brandy and a wobbly woman.

Saying that, this section of the book is a good place to start for any tyro tyke, desperate to grow out of snotty surliness and become elegantly wasted.

There are interesting pieces on those English poets and essayists whose writing and behaviour had such a massive influence on the modern rock star mentality.

In a piece titled Decadent Outcasts, Nick Broom discusses Chatterton, Coleridge and De Quincey, who specialised in debauched behaviour, copious drug and alcohol abuse and, of course, that most romantic of all activities, early death. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Books: Take a Dive into Decadence; ROWAN PELLING the Decadent Handbook - for the Modern Libertine (Dedalus, Pounds 15)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.