Conkey Counts on Experience; Retired Aviator Wants to Draw on Military Lessons for Office

By Cearnal, Deborah | The Florida Times Union, October 28, 2006 | Go to article overview

Conkey Counts on Experience; Retired Aviator Wants to Draw on Military Lessons for Office


Cearnal, Deborah, The Florida Times Union


Byline: DEBORAH CEARNAL

A career in the military has given Doug Conkey the skills necessary to be a good commissioner, the candidate says.

"I was trained to get all the sides to render a good decision," he said during an interview. "You gather the facts and views and in the end it proves best for the organization," he said.

As a Navy pilot, he was used to going through a checklist before, during and after flights. He intends to use that checklist-type approach to commission business, doing his homework, lining up the pros and cons of an issue, listening to the public and then making a decision.

"I want to make the process more visible, show the people the facts, the timeline and get the best for the people," the lifelong Republican said.

The dumping scandal, he said, "showed we need to improve the process. There was a breakdown of rules, a breakdown of the link in the chain. It seemed to be systemic of the operation."

Even before Patrick McGovern announced that he would not seek re-election to his District 2 commission seat, Conkey had indicated he would run for the office McGovern had held for 14 years.

Having retired from the Navy only six months before his early November 2005 announcement, Conkey was "looking for a second career."

"I decided I want to do something with a high level of job satisfaction," he said. Having grown up with politically active parents, Conkey chose public work.

"It was something I always wanted to do. As a youth, I saw that at the local level you have the most impact. I wanted the opportunity to serve the people."

His quest just happened to be "the right place, the right time," he said.

He laughs when he says he is a real estate salesman. "I have been in real estate a year," he said, adding that he has fashioned only a few contracts.

"I am by no means shaping Clay County," he smiled.

And shaping the county is one of his platform issues.

"Growth is not unique to Clay County. Growth management is a skill all its own that requires training," he said. "We need to harness that energy in a controlled environment" and evaluate projects in a logical, timeline manner. His campaign literature says he wants the county to "develop a master plan to keep county government proactive."

Included in that would be creating a "solid-well-funded transportation plan addressing future growth," the pamphlet says. Encouraging economic development "to balance tax-base growth" is another goal.

Conkey says he believes he can bring leadership, vision and integrity to the commission.

"Even if you don't agree, you can act professionally and be courteous," he said. "There is nothing worse than saying one thing and doing another. It [serving] will not always be easy."

deborah. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Conkey Counts on Experience; Retired Aviator Wants to Draw on Military Lessons for Office
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.