4 States OK Bans on Gay 'Marriage'; Four Others Likely; S. Dakotans Reject Abortion Ban; Stem-Cell Law Trails in Missouri

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 8, 2006 | Go to article overview

4 States OK Bans on Gay 'Marriage'; Four Others Likely; S. Dakotans Reject Abortion Ban; Stem-Cell Law Trails in Missouri


Byline: Joyce Howard Price, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Voters were opposing same-sex "marriage" yesterday in all eight states where the issue was on the ballot, while voters in South Dakota rejected a state abortion law.

In Virginia, with 64 percent of precincts reporting, a proposed constitutional amendment to ban homosexual "marriage" and to define marriage as an institution involving one man and one woman was leading 57 percent to 43 percent.

In South Carolina, with 7 percent of precincts reporting, 46,184 voters, or 72 percent, supported the ban on homosexual "marriage." Twenty-eight percent, or 17,664, opposed the ban.

In Tennessee, only 1 percent of precincts reported results on the same-sex "marriage" question shortly after 9 p.m. But 197,523 voters 83 percent voted yes for a ban. Another 39,476 voters, or 17 percent, voted no.

Five other states Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, South Dakota and Wisconsin had similar constitutional amendments on their ballots that were passing last night.

Luis Vizcaino, spokesman for the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest political organization for homosexuals, said bans on same-sex "marriage" won by overwhelming majorities in 2004, but he does not foresee that trend in this election.

"We feel there has been a significant shift either in the political climate or the public perception of same-sex 'marriage'" during the past two years, he said in an interview last night.

In yesterday's election, Colorado also had a rival measure on its ballot, calling for the legal recognition of "domestic partnerships" between people of the same sex, even if the measure banning same-sex "marriage" passed. The question calling for legal domestic partnerships would give homosexual couples the same legal rights as married couples. The passage of that measure was too close to call last night.

In South Dakota, voters opposed the retention of a state ban on all abortions except those needed to save a mother's life. Also in the state, a measure that would make judges liable for imprisonment and financial punishment because of decisions they make failed 90 percent to 10 percent.

In Missouri, with 6 percent of precincts reporting, a ballot measure that would allow embryonic stem-cell research in that state was trailing, 52 percent to 48 percent, shortly before 10 p.m. last night.

In Michigan, with 8 percent of precincts reporting, supporters of the so-called Michigan Civil Rights Initiative were leading 66 percent to 35 percent. That measure would eliminate racial and other preferences in the state in the areas of public hiring, public contracting, and admissions to public colleges and universities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

4 States OK Bans on Gay 'Marriage'; Four Others Likely; S. Dakotans Reject Abortion Ban; Stem-Cell Law Trails in Missouri
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.