Intelligent Design Decisions Lead to Efficient Construction

By Patrick, William J.; Wyllie, Robert D. | Corrections Today, April 1994 | Go to article overview

Intelligent Design Decisions Lead to Efficient Construction


Patrick, William J., Wyllie, Robert D., Corrections Today


The Federal Bureau of Prisons' federal correctional complex (FCC) in Florence, Colo., is the largest FCC in history. Built in 1992 on a 600-acre site, it houses 2,450 inmates in separate facilities for minimum, medium, high and maximum security. This self-sufficient complex also includes a central utilities plant, a central food service storage area, institutions and prison industries warehouses. The completion of this massive project entailed a great deal of planning and coordination by the architect, the program manager, the contractors and the BOP to ensure cost-efficiency in design and construction and operations.

Design and Construction

In the design and construction of any public facility, a primary concern is that taxpayers receive good value for their money. A facility must operate efficiently, provide an acceptable environment for prison employees, fulfill the legal standards for incarceration and comply with local building codes. The facility's design should strike a balance between being flexible and overaccommodating potential change requests. Finally, the facility should be able to handle increases in its population.

A combination of intelligent design choices, prototypical design, pre-engineered systems, on-site management, and local purchasing and employment can help ensure value and efficiency. Following is a discussion of these five potential means of holding down costs and maximizing resources.

Intelligent design choices. Making intelligent design choices means choosing materials and methods carefully. It involves life-cycle costing, trade-off costing and value analysis. The goal is to ensure that a facility is built in the most efficient manner and with the best value in materials, both initially and for the long term.

* Life-cycle costing evaluates the cost of a material or

system over its lifetime, including any required maintenance.

* Trade-off costing evaluates different first-time costs

for alternate materials.

* Value analysis examines how essential functional

requirements are addressed to achieve the lowest possible

cost by taking into consideration initial cost and

life-cycle cost.

At FCC-Florence, the facilities were required to meet a multi-decade life cycle for durability as well as incorporate a number of specialized security features in maximum security units. Therefore, the architects, program managers and corrections officials involved in the project evaluated all potential efficiency ideas carefully. Using more durable materials in some areas, such as brick rather than pre-cast concrete, can be less expensive over the life of a facility.

Prototypical design. Prototypical design, especially in minimum and medium security facilities, can create significant design savings. By taking a proven "footprint" for a facility and adapting it to a particular area, a corrections agency can get the advantages of cost savings while still meeting local design considerations. Using a prototype greatly reduces or eliminates the conceptual and design development phases of the design process, thus shortening schedules and lessening the design effort and corresponding fees. It is essential to develop a prototype that fits the correctional program, not the reverse. Further, prototypes must be site-adapted to accommodate variations in topography and soil conditions.

The soils at FCC-Florence are an expansive clay, requiring more than 7,000 drilled piers and grade beams throughout the complex. The same prototype facility being built in another location would require a foundation appropriate to the specific soil conditions of that location. Although adaptation requires some design expertise, the work is minor compared to the architecture and engineering involved in developing an original design.

When using a prototypical design, project teams can enhance building security by siting the facility to take advantage of local conditions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Intelligent Design Decisions Lead to Efficient Construction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.