Music: WIN Magic Numbers Album; PLUS YOU CAN TAKE THE BAND HOME!

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), November 12, 2006 | Go to article overview

Music: WIN Magic Numbers Album; PLUS YOU CAN TAKE THE BAND HOME!


Byline: by Paul Cole, Jack Daniels & David Brookes

WIN the new Magic Numbers album - and take the band back home with you!

That's the pop prize offer from Preview and the cuddliest band in the charts.

We're giving away copies of the Numbers' hot new album Those The Brokes.

And for our main prize-winner, there'll be exclusive Magic memorabilia.

We've got a set of figurines of the band, specially designed to promote the album. They're not on sale in the shops, so the set is an instant collector's item.

You can treasure it, give it as a present or sell it on eBay some time in the future!

You'll also get a copy of the new album - and for four runners-up, we have CDs too.

Here's how YOU could be a winner.

Simply tell us the name of the new Magic Numbers album.

Is it (a) Rose The Blokes, (b) Those The Brokes or (c) Froze The Cokes?

BY POST: Write your answer on a postcard or on the back of a sealed envelope. Add your name, address and daytime phone number and send it to Magic Numbers Promotion, PO Box 39, Birmingham, B4 6AH.

BY PHONE: Call the competition Hotline on 0901 380 1806 and leave your name, address, daytime phone number and your answer. Calls cost no more than 25p from landlines. Mobile phone costs may vary.

BY TEXT: Text your answer to 86633. Write SM3 at the beginning of your text, followed by a space, your answer and your name, house number and post-code. Texts cost 25p (plus your standard message rate).

BY E-MAIL: You can e-mail the answer to the question, along with your name and address, to entry@mrn.co.uk stating 'Mercury Magic Numbers' in the subject box.

All entries must be in by midday on Thursday November 16, 2006. Usual Sunday Mercury rules apply. There is no cash alternative. Winners list available on request.

Birmingham Post & Mail and Trinity Mirror group companies may contact you by phone, letter, SMS or e-mail with details of goods and services you may be interested in, dependant on your route of entry.

If you don't want to receive texts or e-mail, add 'no alerts' at the end of your message.

THE MAGIC NUMBERS Those The Brokes (Heavenly)

pick of the week

THEY charmed the pants off you with their debut album. Now The Magic Numbers have their wicked way with you.

The pure pop songs on their eponymous 2005 set were such a delightful distraction that no-one quite realised just how good a band the latter-day Mamas & Papas were.

Now, they put the record straight with a powerful performance that proves there's more to their music than hippy chic nostalgia and those insanely hummable hooks.

Several of the songs here stretch past the five-minute mark, with show-stoppers Slow Down (The Way It Goes) and semi-plugged Goodnight close on seven minutes apiece. The former is the moment it all comes together, the band's wayward harmonies riding on Romeo Stodart's soulful guitar and pop production so polished you can see your face in it.

Biggest surprises, however, are You've Never Had It and Take A Chance, both of which add unexpected guitar crunch - and Most Of The Time, which is old-fashioned funky. They've gone for brokes this time, and it's magic. PC

MILBURN Well Well Well (Mercury)

THE Kinks did it. So did Squeeze and Blur. Now it's Lily Allen and Arctic Monkeys who are leading the pack with sharply-observed snapshots of streetlife. But coming up fast on the rails is Milburn, another spiky-pop band from Sheffield (must be something in the water), whose high-energy album is shot through with contemporary wit and wisdom. Songs such as Last Bus and What You Could've Won examine nights out on the tiles, while Showroom savages the same poseurs who populate the Monkeys' Fake Tales of San Francisco. Frontman Joe Carnall's laddish vocal sprawls over speedy strums, tight basslines and tumbling drums in glorious explosion. …

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