School-Based Clinics: An Opportunity for Social Workers to Address Youth Violence

By Ross, Judith W. | Health and Social Work, May 1994 | Go to article overview

School-Based Clinics: An Opportunity for Social Workers to Address Youth Violence


Ross, Judith W., Health and Social Work


Although we are reminded regularly of the violence-prone nature of our society, the details and pervasiveness of assaults, robberies, child abuse, and senseless, vicious acts are shocking. Political and social debates about gun control, eradication of gang and drug-related crimes, and censorship of television violence often have the effect of increasing anxiety and reinforcing a sense of helplessness.

Professor Mark Singer of the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences in Cleveland recently received wide press coverage for his study documenting the pervasiveness of exposure to violence among high school students. Young people are widely implicated as victims and perpetrators; the National Center for Health Statistics (1993) now rates violence as the third leading cause of death of children ages five to 14. But violence does not always end in death. Gunshots, beatings, or stabbings frequently result in spinal cord and head injuries. Child abuse may cause complex neurological and functional sequelae, disfigurement, learning problems, and social and emotional dysfunction.

Social workers in the health field are familiar with violence and its outcomes. People who experience violence meet social workers in emergency departments, trauma and rehabilitation units, burn centers, and obstetric and pediatric services. Often social workers assess and report to authorities. alleged cases of abuse and maltreatment. Despite our efforts, the problems of adjustment and recovery from the physical, social, and emotional consequences of violence are often insurmountable.

Violence as a Public Health

Concern

The effects of violence on health are far reaching, and the costs to individuals, institutions, and society are staggering. Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop and current Surgeon General Jocelyn Elders have suggested that violence must be viewed as a public health issue. As with other public health problems, we must attend to those who are currently affected by violence, and we must invest ourselves and our resources to prevent its continued spread. Identifying violence as a public health problem will pave the way for new initiatives in settings where health and mental health care services are provided.

School-Based Clinics and

Health Programs

Access to Children

It is imperative that we reach as many children as possible as soon as possible. Schools are the obvious places to interact with children and to study, identify, treat, and prevent youth violence and its causes. School-based and school-linked clinics present important opportunities for social workers to connect with a vital initiative and to help children and their families cope with a vast array of social and emotional problems that contribute to violent acting-out behavior.

Comprehensive school-based health care clinics were conceived in the early 1970s as an innovative model of delivering health care services to adolescents (Harold & Harold, 1993). Early projects focused on reproductive health; improvements in birth outcomes were documented. These programs have increased from 61 in 1985 to more than 500 in 1993 (Center for Adolescent Health, 1993). Programs will continue to proliferate, because they can effectively deliver health care services to children and are compatible with the movement toward community health care services delivery.

Funding

Funding of school-based and school-linked clinics has traditionally been dependent on state health and human services departments, federal Medicaid and early intervention and screening programs, maternal child health block grants, local governments, foundations, and school districts (Waszak & Neidell, 1991). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

School-Based Clinics: An Opportunity for Social Workers to Address Youth Violence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.