GOP Balks; Republicans Fall Prey to Political Correctness

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 17, 2006 | Go to article overview

GOP Balks; Republicans Fall Prey to Political Correctness


Byline: Diana West, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Whatever comes of gridlock on Iraq and everything else, here's a rule of thumb: When the flak flies, don't jump into a foxhole with a Republican. Quite simply, Republicans are a menace, at least to other Republicans.

Take Mel Martinez, the Republican senator from Florida tapped by President Bush to become Republican National Committee chairman. Best known for cheering on amnesty for illegals by the millions (i.e, for supporting Mr. Bush's "comprehensive" immigration plan), Mr. Martinez marked his RNC nomination by baiting a large number of Republicans who would like to see the government secure the nation's borders instead. Equating what he called "border security only" with "harshness only," Mr. Martinez referred to Republican electoral losses and said: "It's not about bashing people; it's about presenting a hopeful face." Too bad it's not about presenting a "hopeful face" to all those Republicans Mr. Martinez was bashing.

Where can bashed Republicans go? The modern Republican Party is about as politically correct and prey to special interest groups as the Democratic Party. I say this following a shameful party purge in Florida. There, the state Republican Party, up to and including Gov. Jeb Bush, came down ton-of-bricks-like on two Hernando County Republicans who publicly decried Islam as a "hateful and frightening religion."

Actually, it was Mary Ann Hogan who used the language in a blistering, pre-election letter to Hernando Today, complaining about county employees being used to ferry children's games to a mosque celebrating the end of Ramadan (a holiday, she noted, that "Muslims in Iraq" marked by killing more American soldiers than we had lost in a long time). When asked to apologize, her husband, County Commissioner Tom Hogan Sr., steadfastly echoed his wife's opinion: "Overall, worldwide, it certainly is," said Mr. Hogan, a founder of the county GOP. "Don't you read your own paper?"

Faster than you can say "Stalinist show trial," the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) called on Gov. Bush to fire Mr. Hogan, whose term, as it happened, expired this week. I wish I could report that Mr. Bush, outraged, sent CAIR the Hamas-linked group, several of whose associates have been convicted or deported on terrorism-related charges packing. But he didn't. He condemned the couple, triggering a chain of condemnations from the state GOP chairman, the Republican gubernatorial candidate (now Gov. …

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