Csi: Brum; Behind the Scenes: The Real-Life Forensic Special Experts Leading the Way in Crime-Busting with DNA

Sunday Mercury (Birmingham, England), November 19, 2006 | Go to article overview

Csi: Brum; Behind the Scenes: The Real-Life Forensic Special Experts Leading the Way in Crime-Busting with DNA


Byline: BY ADAM ASPIIUALL

IT'S the US crime-fighting show which has become a worldwide success by glamorising forensic science.

CSI is so popular that it has three separate series - Miami, New York and Las Vegas - as well as hundreds of fan clubs around the globe.

And when producers need inspiration for a new storyline they know exactly where to find it.

In Birmingham.

The city is home to the world-leading Forensics Science Service, or FSS for short.

It has consistently pushed the boundaries in the hi-tech fight against crime and is currently processing around 50,000 DNA samples a month - more than any other country.

The Sunday Mercury was given a rare tour of its cutting-edge HQ last week by Business Development Manager Tom Notman.

A tall, athletic Scotsman with a steely handshake, he looks like he could have come straight from the set of I CSI.

But while Mr Notman distanced himself from the US programme, he did admit a grudging affection for the often I far-fetched plots and exoticlocations.

Future

"I think we need a bit more soft-focus lighting I to make us look the part of the CSI characters to be honest!" he said.

"And we certainly don't have one person who can do everything to solve a case in an hour as they do on the show.

"Yet it's no exaggeration to say that the technology we are developing here will one day be as good as it is on CSI.

"We have all sorts of TV I people who visit us to find out the future direction forensics is heading in. That is because they want their shows to look as realistic as possible.

"We can't quite turn up at the crime scene with all our tools in a briefcase just yet.

"But our latest development, Forensic Response Vehicles, is the first step in that direction."

The FSS has taken delivery of two new FRVs, which are effectively mobile laboratories.

They will link up with West Midlands Police at scenes of crime to carry out on-the-spot forensic analysis of evidence.

"The FRVs are unique to us," said Mr Notman. "They are able to carry out a range of real-time forensic analysis at the crime scene, giving police access to the very latest technology on the spot.

"We have produced the only rugged and portable DNA detection equipment in the world. It will help police speed up their investigation process by giving them forensic results straight away.

"This will help them to charge offenders quicker, without having to release suspects while they await forensic results."

The FRVs resemble mobile homes from the outside. But once inside, they take on the look of road-going space stations.

Hermetically sealed, they are divided into two labs fitted with the latest DNA testing technology.

Currently, crime solving using forensics can be a lengthy process.

A specially-trained cop or civilian - a Scenes of Crime Officer - will be called to an incident to collect possible forensic evidence. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Csi: Brum; Behind the Scenes: The Real-Life Forensic Special Experts Leading the Way in Crime-Busting with DNA
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.