Video Production: A New Technological Curricula: A Systematic Analysis of Goals, Available Materials, Teacher Knowledge, and Student Outcomes Is Used as the Foundation of an Integrated Curriculum

By Loveland, Thomas; Harrison, Hal | The Technology Teacher, November 2006 | Go to article overview

Video Production: A New Technological Curricula: A Systematic Analysis of Goals, Available Materials, Teacher Knowledge, and Student Outcomes Is Used as the Foundation of an Integrated Curriculum


Loveland, Thomas, Harrison, Hal, The Technology Teacher


Introduction

As the push for teaching across the curriculum increases, it is important to develop new and innovative ways to teach different subjects through the use of one vehicle. Programs currently in place strive to integrate the academic subjects (English, mathematics, language, history, etc.) into the technology education classroom. However, the connections are mostly unrealized by the students who take the classes. Another aspect of teaching across the curriculum is that of collaboration. It has long been a struggle to integrate teachers of academic subjects with projects technology educators are accomplishing in classrooms. One suitable solution may be to use communication technology as a content deliverer and more specifically, a video production technology course, to serve as the vehicle to integrate teacher collaboration among the variety of academic subject areas (ITEA, 2000/2002).

Television production has been in place in middle and high schools for the past several years. Once thought of as an English elective, media communications, or journalism class, these courses have begun to evolve from a focus on news reporting to encompass many technical aspects of the television production process. Many schools now have facilities where students can produce and broadcast news programs, special events, and television shows they have created and developed. Although these courses and facilities were not necessarily designed for student use, they could be redesigned in a project-based setting to teach the elements of video production and its many entities through a standards-based communications technology course sequence. The first course, Communications Technology I, would introduce students to the many communication systems available: printing, digital photography, desktop publishing, web-page design, and audio and video production. Whether called Video Production Technology, TV Production, or Communication Technology II and III, the next courses would focus on the content and processes of video communication.

Links to Standards for Technological Literacy

Technology education is the study of technology and the preparation of learners to be technologically literate. To be technologically literate, students must know how to use technology to identify problems and opportunities to solve problems or meet human needs; identify, select, and use resources; identify, select, and use appropriate technological processes; and evaluate finished solutions (ITEA, 1996). Video production technology is an excellent model for application of both content and process-based learning, with the goal of preparing technologically literate students in the area of communication technology. Properly planned, a video course will give students an opportunity for intensive research and design during the scripting stages, and exciting hands-on work during taping and editing.

In video production technology, students learn and demonstrate many of the Grade 9-12 benchmarks of Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology (STL) (ITEA, 2000/2002). The students learn and demonstrate that:

* Information and communication technologies include the inputs, processes, and outputs associated with sending and receiving information (STL 17-L).

* The video production design process includes defining a problem, brainstorming, researching and generating ideas, identifying criteria and specifying constraints, selecting the correct approach, and developing the film proposal (STL 8-H).

* Systematic planning in video production involves logic and creativity with appropriate compromises in complex real-life problems (STL 2-W).

* Video projects can be used to inform, persuade, entertain, control, manage, and educate (STL 17-N).

* Film language communicates using visuals, audio, and graphics that incorporate a variety of visual and auditory stimuli (STL 17-Q). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Video Production: A New Technological Curricula: A Systematic Analysis of Goals, Available Materials, Teacher Knowledge, and Student Outcomes Is Used as the Foundation of an Integrated Curriculum
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.