Web Designer

Wales On Sunday (Cardiff, Wales), November 19, 2006 | Go to article overview

Web Designer


Byline: By Wales on Sunday

What do website designers do?

They design the pages that make up a website. They use a combination of programming techniques and web design software to build a new site or enhance an existing one. A good web designer needs a knowledge of 'front-end' concepts (how the site looks), and 'back-end' systems (how it works). In other words, they need to be technically proficient but also creatively-minded.

At the start of a job, the designer works with the client, discussing their requirements to find out exactly what they want their site to do. This could be anything from an interactive site for educational purposes to a retail site selling consumer goods. It is important that designers gain a clear understanding of the target audience.

Every aspect of the site is discussed, including how to organise the site's information, the size and style of text and colours.

Designers build a draft working version of the website, using both general and specialised authoring software, then refine it with the client.

When a site is finished, designers carry out checks to make sure it is fully functional and meets all the requirements. Once the client is satisfied, the designer uploads the site to a server for publication online.

What are the hours like?

Website designers working for a company normally work 37 to 40 hours a week, Monday to Friday. They may have to work some evenings and/or weekends to meet deadlines or when problems arise. Self-employed designers work the hours necessary to complete assignments on time.

Designers work indoors in an office or home environment. They may be based at one site or travel to visit clients, in which case a driving licence is useful.

What skills do I need?

You should have some knowledge of internet programming and scripting languages, be proficient in the main web design software packages, have a strong creative skills and possess good problem-solving skills, together with a logical and analytical approach to work. …

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