Malaria Reversal: Drug Regains Potency in African Nation

By Seppa, N. | Science News, November 11, 2006 | Go to article overview

Malaria Reversal: Drug Regains Potency in African Nation


Seppa, N., Science News


An inexpensive drug that has lost much of its punch against malaria over the past 20 years is showing signs of regaining its strength in the African nation of Malawi. But researchers warn that the entire continent would have to coordinate its fight against the disease in order for the drug to regain a prominent place among malaria fighters.

Doctors have used the drug, chloroquine, to treat malaria for 60 years, but Plasmodium falciparum, the protozoan that causes severe malaria, has become increasingly resistant. Malawi abandoned the drug in 1993, and doctors there replaced it with an inexpensive combination pill containing sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine. Scientists took note.

The Malawi strategy worked for several years. But eventually, the combination drug became less and less effective against P. falciparum. The emerging therapy of choice in Africa is now a more expensive, more complex treatment that includes derivatives of artemisinin--an extract of the Chinese herbal remedy called sweet wormwood (SN: 2/7/04, p. 94).

Meanwhile, scientists working in Malawi have found that the malaria protozoan recovered from patients no longer harbored a mutation that makes it resistant to chloroquine, says Miriam K. Laufer, a pediatric infectious-disease physician at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.

To find out whether the drug might again be effective, Laufer and her colleagues last year identified 210 Malawian children with malaria and gave half of them chloroquine and half of them the sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine combination.

Of 80 children who had received chloroquine and were monitored over 4 weeks, all but one cleared the parasite from their blood. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Malaria Reversal: Drug Regains Potency in African Nation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.