Most in U.S. Hold on to Thanksgiving Traditions; Americans Weigh in on Turkey Consumption, Dessert Preference

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 23, 2006 | Go to article overview

Most in U.S. Hold on to Thanksgiving Traditions; Americans Weigh in on Turkey Consumption, Dessert Preference


Byline: Jennifer Harper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

For better or worse, someone is always trying to teach an old holiday new tricks. Thanksgiving is not immune to a few cheeky, revisionist ideas out to challenge the old traditions.

It could be an epic battle, as some things are firmly entrenched in America. We are still grateful for our lot in life, for one thing: 85 percent of us report we've got much to be thankful for, according to a Rasmussen poll released yesterday. Despite the travails of Election Day, Republicans are more likely to be happy than Democrats, 92 percent to 83 percent, respectively, even though the poll of 1,000 adults was conducted last Thursday and Friday after the election.

The old Norman Rockwell vision of Thanksgiving family, a burgeoning table, contented smiles also is intact. The poll found that 42 percent will enjoy today's big meal at home, 41 percent will be in a relative's home and 8 percent will dine with friends. Five percent will eat in a restaurant.

Oh, and "turkey is tops" with 81 percent of the population; almost half expect to eat too much of it today.

Our gobbler gobbling is considerable. Americans will consume 46 million turkeys today, according to the National Turkey Federation; our troops in Iraq alone will chow down on 20 tons, according to the Army's 1st Calvalry Division.

We do have pronounced opinions about turkeys, once favored over the bald eagle as our national emblem by none other than Benjamin Franklin.

More than 20,000 people, for example, responded to a White House call to name the two turkeys Flyer and Fryer who benefited yesterday from the customary pre-Thanksgiving presidential pardon. President Bush also ordered them sent in first-class airline seats to serve as grand marshalls of the Disneyland Thanksgiving Day Parade. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Most in U.S. Hold on to Thanksgiving Traditions; Americans Weigh in on Turkey Consumption, Dessert Preference
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.