Americans Favor 'Merry Christmas'; Surveys Find a Majority 'Bothered' by Absence of Greeting in Stores

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 30, 2006 | Go to article overview

Americans Favor 'Merry Christmas'; Surveys Find a Majority 'Bothered' by Absence of Greeting in Stores


Byline: Jennifer Harper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Go ahead, say "Merry Christmas." Americans want it that way, according to a new survey, which found that 69 percent of us prefer the traditional greeting over a generic "happy holidays," which garnered a mere 23 percent of the vote.

There are some partisan differences, though. The survey by Rasmussen Reports found that 85 percent of Republicans prefer "Merry Christmas," compared with 61 percent of Democrats.

"The growing trend of political correctness runs against the tide of popular opinion," the survey of 1,000 adults stated. It was conducted Nov. 18-19 with a margin of error of three percentage points.

Other polls had similar findings. A survey of 1,000 adults conducted by America's Research Group released yesterday found that 53 percent were "bothered" if merchants omitted "Merry Christmas" in their stores and signage. A CNBC survey released Monday also found that "most Americans said they prefer 'Merry Christmas' to the more nondenominational 'Happy Holidays.'"

The Alliance Defense Fund is riled up over the Christmas cause. The Arizona-based legal group, which specializes in defending religious liberty, has lined up 930 attorneys nationwide to challenge "improper attempts to censor the celebration of Christmas" on public property or schools.

"It's ridiculous that Americans have to think twice about whether it's OK to say Merry Christmas," said ADF spokesman Alan Sears. "Thanks to the [American Civil Liberties Union] and its allies, Christmas isn't what it used to be. It's time to repair the damage that such organizations have done to America's favorite holiday. …

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