Business Etiquette: Blunders Quiz

By Pagana, Kathleen | Business Credit, November-December 2006 | Go to article overview

Business Etiquette: Blunders Quiz


Pagana, Kathleen, Business Credit


Office etiquette during the holiday season goes beyond knowing which fork to use during the company party. How you behave in the off-hours you spend with your co-workers can affect your entire year. Drinking too much can cost you a promotion or even your job, and shooting your mouth off can ruin your reputation as well as the reputation of others.

Jennifer was really happy with her new job and eagerly looked forward to the annual holiday party. With free drinks and great music, she really relaxed and partied hard. Several weeks later, she was disappointed when she found out that she did not get a promotion. She was shocked when she found out that her behavior at the party had gotten her the reputation of being a "loose cannon" or "party girl." She lost her credibility as being a good representative for a company position that required a lot of travel and business meals.

Have you ever wished you knew more about business etiquette at holiday dinners, interview luncheons and award banquets? Knowing some essential tips can help you benefit from these opportunities without worrying about eating from the wrong salad bowl or not properly introducing your guest to your boss. Test your knowledge of business etiquette with the short quiz below.

Questions

1. A business meal is a time to relax and "let loose."

True or False

2. Whose name do you say first when introducing your spouse to your boss?

Spouse or Boss

3. Clothing is never neutral. It either adds or detracts from a professional image.

True or False

4. A man should wait for a woman in business to extend her hand for a handshake.

True or False

5. A drink should be held in the right hand at a cocktail party.

True or False

6. Where would you find your salad plate?

To the right of the entree plate or To the left of the entree plate

7. Is it appropriate to tell an associate that she has spinach in her teeth?

True or False

8. If you need to excuse yourself during a meal, you place your napkin to the left of your place setting.

Yes or No

9. BBQ ribs are a good meal option at a company banquet. True or False

10. Pushing back your plate signals you are finished eating.

True or False

Answers

1. False. A business meal is not a time to relax and "let loose". It is a test of your social skills and your level of sophistication. Your interpersonal skills, including your treatment of the wait staff, are on display. One of the biggest blunders at the business meal is alcohol abuse. You can undo months and years of good impressions by excessive drinking. The key point to remember is that "business" should always be the number one item on the menu.

2. The boss's name should be said first. Proper introductions have a pecking order with the person of rank, honor, or importance being mentioned first. The other person is being introduced or presented to the person of honor. Follow these three steps. One, say the name of the key person. Two, mention the name of the other person and say something about him or her. …

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