Royalty and Diplomacy; Saudi Prince Gets Both Jobs Done

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 5, 2006 | Go to article overview

Royalty and Diplomacy; Saudi Prince Gets Both Jobs Done


Byline: Martin Sieff, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

From the start of the Reagan administration through the first Gulf War, the most important, powerful and successful diplomat in the world was Prince Bandar bin Sultan, the Saudi ambassador to the United States. He remains a profoundly significant global player today.

William Simpson has produced an exceptionally valuable and sympathetic, but nuanced and fair portrait of this remarkable man. Mr. Simpson, who is British, is a lifelong friend of Prince Bandar's since their days together in officer training at the British Royal Air Force College, Cranwell, but his work does not read as a hagiography. Instead, the book benefits from Mr. Simpson's deep personal knowledge of this complex, talented and multilayered man.

Prince Bandar's achievements, international credibility and continuing global clout are extraordinary, and transcend the normal definitions of political and international relations analysis. What other current or recent diplomat could expect to find two world leaders as disparate as former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of Britain and former President Nelson Mandela of South Africa to provide glowing and appreciative forwards to a book on his life?

Prince Bandar, as Mr. Simpson documents in immense detail, was the key linchpin of the Saudi-U.S. alliance of the 1980s that transformed the world and played a leading role in the toppling of international communism and the fall of the Soviet Union.

The alliance was also the essential underpinning and prerequisite for the tremendous, world-transforming American economic recovery and unprecedented boom of the 1980s and 1990s. It ensured a cheap, reliable supply of oil to the industrialized world. Mr. Simpson makes a an overwhelming case for his contention that the Reagan administration was able to win the Cold War thanks to the flow of Saudi petrodollars financing crucial intelligence operations and political initiatives around the world.

Prince Bandar was also a consummate political operator. Mr. Simpson describes him as Machiavellian. In a sense this may be unfair to a man who was and remains a committed patriot and servant of his country, who was also committed to an enduring alliance with the United States and who opposed both Communist and extreme anti-Western Islamist forces.

But it is a fitting term to describe the skills and political shrewdness with which Prince Bandar operated. He always took the long-term view but was also adept at handling short-term tactical crises. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Royalty and Diplomacy; Saudi Prince Gets Both Jobs Done
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.