Scientists Should Advise Politicians on Science Policy

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 6, 2006 | Go to article overview

Scientists Should Advise Politicians on Science Policy


Byline: By Dylan Jones Evans

As someone who has been advocating the crucial need for a Welsh science policy for a number of years, I was immensely disappointed that, four years on from when I made my call for more science funding at an Economic Development Committee in the Assembly, the Labour Government here in Wales has come up with a document that, at best, can be called unambitious, tepid and totally unworthy of meeting the economic challenges that face our nation over the next decade. More worryingly, there seems to have been a total misunderstanding from the authors of what actually constitutes a science policy.

It is not, as the document suggests, about developing national priorities in health, energy, the hydrogen economy, the environment, and sustainability. A science policy is about developing the key scientific competencies in disciplines that underpin fields, such as optoelectronics, nanotechnology, molecular biology, physiology, nuclear engineering and electrochemistry.

A science policy is about having those subjects stocked with excellent people and excellent equipment developing strong research in key scientific disciplines such as physics, chemistry, biology and engineering.

Only last week, I spoke to a leading industrialist in the field of biotechnology who had recently established his business in St Asaph in North Wales. When asked why he chose the location, he said the main reason was that they were sufficiently close to the scientific base in the North West of England and the high number of graduate scientists being produced there every year. No mention of North Wales and its university institutions at all, which is extremely worrying.

According to a recent Institute of Welsh Affairs paper by Sir John Cadogan, former chair of the research councils, there is a massive scientific and engineering deficit in Wales, especially in growing areas such as medical research.

He, and other eminent Welsh scientists, has suggested that this is a direct result of the Assembly GovernmentAEs under funding of universities. For example, grant aid per student in Wales is pounds 4,933 as compared to pounds 5,987 in Scotland and pounds 5,826 in England. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Scientists Should Advise Politicians on Science Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.