Freddie Marsden; OBITUARY

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), December 14, 2006 | Go to article overview

Freddie Marsden; OBITUARY


THE high rise of the drummer's noble brow was unsuited to the mop-top hair fashion adopted by the big beat groups of the era.

Nonetheless, the face of Freddie Marsden was clasped in the lockets of many pubescent girls, though never as many as his younger brother, Gerry, who had a smile as wide as a cob of corn and the natural charm and talent needed to follow the much-trod path from rock star to all-round entertainer.

Their father, Fred, a railway clerk, entertained his friends in the parlour of their terraced house in Menzies Street, Dingle, Liverpool, by playing the banjolele, George Formby-style.

At the time, Freddie had his eyes on a coveted place at St Francis Xavier Grammar, which he left with an O level in maths.

Long before that, however, Fred had stretched the skin from one of his banjoleles over a Quality Street chocolate tin. "There, son," he said, "this is your first snare drum".

The brothers formed the Gerry Marsden Trio, with their pals, Dixie Dean or Mick Taylor, making the third member.

Gerry went to Our Lady of Mount Carmel secondary modern school. In those days, the boys piled onto a bus with all their instruments. …

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