Walking the Fine Line between Pleasure and Pain

Cape Times (South Africa), December 15, 2006 | Go to article overview

Walking the Fine Line between Pleasure and Pain


There are times when there are just not enough words to explain how much fun there is to be had with this job.

Sure, it comes with its fair amount of pressures - which job doesn't? And, yes, there are times when I want to pull my hair out with frustration, but then there are those moments that make it all worthwhile. Not many people understand that fine line between pleasure and pain that, for so many years, has been at the centre of many a discussion about life and its minutiae. Suffice it to say, this job has helped me appreciate this.

The interview on page three of today's Top of the Times was easily one of the most fun times you can have. It's Marc Lottering, after all. He arrived at my place with Aunty Merle neatly packed in a bag - well, not Merle per se, but the outfit that she was going to wear to her very first, exclusive interview and photo shoot.

He spent a few minutes in the bedroom to prepare and, when he emerged, there stood a transformed Lottering as Aunty Merle, in all her splendour, ready for the photo shoot. While the photographer clicked away, Aunty Merle kicked into performance mode, sharing all kinds of shaggy dog stories that had me in absolute stitches.

This is without any script - just the twisty little tales of what an older, coloured woman remembers - with each nuance perfectly placed. And it was such a pleasure to receive Aunty Merle in my lounge, even though she made a few unkind asides about the couch and the "talk I have to have with my maid about not cleaning the place properly". …

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