T-YOU; Everyone's a Critic

The Florida Times Union, December 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

T-YOU; Everyone's a Critic


So you think Matt Soergel must be on a Sno-cap sugar high when he sees films? Everyone's a Critic lets you play movie reviewer. Here's what "regular folks" think of movies currently playing at the multiplex.

Bobby - I wasn't even born during the time this movie takes place, but it stirs your emotions. Written by Emilio Estevez, the varied, interwoven storylines leading up to the tragic evening illustrate that Robert F. Kennedy brought hope during a troubled time. The most powerful, memorable part is the actual footage; the words in his speeches speak for themselves.

Ellen Lord, 37, Southside

Bobby - Heartbreaking, deeply affecting, rekindling long-ago idealistic dreams for a better world that seemed within reach, channeled through the aspirations, intelligence and humanitarianism of Bobby Kennedy. This wonderful film uniquely and brilliantly recreates that elusive "what could have been." Subsequently, our goal is to establish like-minded political icons in positions of future power, thus transforming "what could have been" into an essential, necessary, reality.

Ellen Weiss, 71, Orange Park

Deja Vu - It is just that to those who've seen numerous other time-travel films. But the always charismatic Denzel Washington and the slam-bang direction of Tony Scott keep the audience from wondering whether any of this makes any sense. Too bad that Scott and the screenwriters apparently broke the rules of their own strained premise to deliver a crowd-pleasing finale.

Arnie Harris, 58, Lawtey

Deja Vu - Other than the fact that the big plot twist "revealed" in the middle of the movie had been given away in the trailers, and time travel paradoxes ALWAYS make a story nonsensical by its conclusion, this film clearly outpoints The Lake House in this year's Time Warp Sweepstakes. Denzel Washington is in his element in this role, and newcomer Paula Patton is great, plus the suspense is steadfastly maintained throughout, so its current success is well earned. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

T-YOU; Everyone's a Critic
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.