Troubles with Wind Power

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 21, 2006 | Go to article overview

Troubles with Wind Power


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

We live in a time when we need to try to reduce our consumption of fossil fuels. It doesn't matter what one's opinion is about global warming we're polluting the environment and need to reverse this trend. No solution should be accepted as a panacea for the problem. Conservation is our best tool. Better insulation, better appliances and more efficient light bulbs would go a long way toward reducing our consumption of electricity. More sensible motor vehicle selection would go a long way toward reducing our consumption of oil and, therefore, reducing dependence on foreign oil.

I read with interest the article "Blowing hot and cold" (Business, Monday), regarding difficulties for the wind industry. Interpreting the comments of industry spokespersons must be tempered with the notion that their employers stand to gain millions in tax incentives, whereas the people in the areas where the turbines are located stand to watch their homelands permanently altered by the construction projects. The businesses can claim they will put things back when the turbines are decommissioned, but there is folly in believing mountain springs, caves and other ecosystems, once altered, substantially can be put back to original form. They can remove the structures and plant vegetation, but the land formations took millions of years to construct.

Many claims of no harm are being put forward by developers, but they have no scientific evidence to support these claims. No thorough, independent scientific investigations have been completed to back claims. …

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Troubles with Wind Power
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