An Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Guidance System

By Cross, Harold D. | Adolescence, Summer 1994 | Go to article overview

An Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Guidance System


Cross, Harold D., Adolescence


Background

Blum (1987) documented the growing problem of adolescent mortality and morbidity related to life style and risk-taking behavior. The death toll for teenagers from motor vehicle accidents, suicide, drug overdose, and AIDS has been rising. In our high school of approximately 700 students, they were periodically checked for typical health maintenance problems throughout their school years, but no consistent assessment and guidance in the areas of social, emotional, nutritional, attitudinal, spiritual life style, and familial risk factors was provided. In order to develop and implement a system that might address these areas, the Maine School Administrative District #22 developed a model health center which opened its doors in February of 1986. Until that time the students were underserved; only one nurse was on site for 30 minutes daily, and there was no designated health center work space. The plan called for the health center to be located in a high-traffic area of the school.

To accomplish the goal of providing broad-based health assessment, a computer-assisted inventory using software developed by the Problem Knowledge Coupler [R] (PKC) Corporation was chosen. The goal for the first year was to have 50% of the freshman class complete the PKC Wellness Coupler [R] (on a voluntary basis). This self-evaluation is done in a manner that is as nonjudgmental, nonprejudicial, and nonthreatening as possible. This approach assures that all questions are asked and presented in a consistent format.

Skinner et al. (1985) provided an additional basis for the use of self-administered lifestyle questions. They found that a ten-minute questionnaire assessment of lifestyle patterns resulted in a two- to three-fold increase in the patient's intention to discuss lifestyle problems with their physician. This finding was demonstrated in the PRO-MIS [R] Clinic experience in 1970 when self-administered, patient health guidance system questionnaires as described in Cross (1972) was started.

The health center staff consists of a nurse with expertise in adolescent health and a paraprofessional school health aide. Additional resources include the school district physician, the school district nurse, and the Rural Pediatrics physicians and staff as needed. (Rural Pediatrics is a department of the Eastern Maine Medical Center, and was the intermediary funding agency for this project.) A community-based advisory committee provided assistance in implementation and evaluation. This committee consisted of physicians, parents, clergy, teachers, students, and school administrators.

Contraceptives and Unplanned Pregnancy

Early in the health center planning stage, several issues were addressed: The advisory committee and the State of Maine Director of the Department of Human Services were in agreement that the center would not dispense contraceptives. This decision kept the school from becoming involved in political and social controversy which so commonly plagues efforts to establish school-based health clinics. It was also decided that the center would provide a minimum of direct medical services. Students with unplanned pregnancies were provided choices of referral.

METHOD

The PKC [R] Wellness Coupler, a computer-driven questionnaire, was chosen because of the breadth of areas covered and the ease of modifying and adapting it to our student population. It was also selected because of Weed's (1991) documentation of the value of a coupler as a management tool, and specifically because each person elicits a unique set of options; the direct connection between reliability of (an individual's) input, and the reliability of output is apparent to the user; immediate printout/feedback is received by the user who is in command of the details; and ambiguities inherent in verbal, "off-the-cuff" discussions about findings and recommendations are minimized.

Each of the standard questionnaire statements was reviewed, then modified and/or deleted. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Adolescent Health and Lifestyle Guidance System
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.