Put Geography on the Map; EDUCATION NOTEBOOK

Daily Mail (London), January 2, 2007 | Go to article overview

Put Geography on the Map; EDUCATION NOTEBOOK


Byline: FRED REDWOOD

HEAD teachers might deny it, but there's a hierarchy of subjects in secondary schools, lead by English, science and maths - the subjects in the headlines when exam results are published.

Others, such as modern languages and history vie for the middle ground.

Close to the bottom comes geography - often regarded a 'filler' on the timetable. But if Daniel Raven-Ellison, 26, head of geography at Langtree School, Woodcote, Reading, has his way that will change.

Indignant that his subject is undervalued, Mr Raven-Ellison is leading a campaign to promote geography throughout the country's schools. 'Geography should be the focal point of the curriculum,' he says, 'the glue that binds the other subjects together - encapsulating science, information technology and an appreciation of the cultures of other lands. It also encourages children to be decision-makers.' But Mr Raven-Ellison has done more than canvas support for geography in his own school. He entered and won a competition run by BBC Radio, and his prize was airtime to publicise his cause while editing Radio 4's Today programme yesterday.

Mr Raven-Ellison has also solicited signatures from 100 leading geography academics in support of a letter to Tessa Jowell outlining his beliefs.

He has set up a website (www.

passion4geography.co.uk) and a web-based competition between the UK and U.S. challenging entrants to find places on a map. It might sound light-hearted but Raven-Ellison isn't joking. 'How can people begin to discuss the complexities of, say, the Middle East if they can't find countries like Iraq and Iran on a map?' he says.

'That's a perfect illustration of why geography is important - it enables children to understand the front pages of our newspapers.' Mr Raven-Ellison has identified specific ways in which geography gets a bad deal in schools.

'Research shows that 80 per cent of geography teachers for Key Stage 3 (11 to 14 year-olds) are non-specialists, which is at the root of the problem,' he says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Put Geography on the Map; EDUCATION NOTEBOOK
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.