It's a "Vision Thing." (Using Computer Aided Design to Plan Bank Facilities)

By Steinborn, Deborah | ABA Banking Journal, August 1994 | Go to article overview

It's a "Vision Thing." (Using Computer Aided Design to Plan Bank Facilities)


Steinborn, Deborah, ABA Banking Journal


Want to move a wall?

Manipulate a teller line for maximum space utilization? How about adding an ATM to accommodate higher lobby traffic?

Believe it or not, these changes don't require any heavy lifting (not initially, anyway). Nowadays, changing a bank's existing facilities, or even creating a new branch, can be decided upon and manipulated with just a personal computer and a few hours of a banker's day.

The advent of portable PCs and computer-aided design technology--software that can move objects and alter shapes and images in an instant, and more often than not in 3-D--is bringing designers, laptops in hand, to bankers' doors.

Just as the computer has infiltrated the ranks of the banking industry, it is being used both to develop plans and to present them to clients in the industrial design, architecture, interior design, and engineering disciplines.

"We can create an ATM lobby and put you right in it, very quickly, on screen," says Curtis Wayne, president, Wayne Architects, P.C., Greenwich, Conn.

"Have a seat, I'll walk you through" On-line design presentation tools can literally walk a banker through a branch, on the PC screen, showing him or her what would be seen from a head teller station, for instance, or from an ATM vestibule--at the brush of a keystroke.

The technology itself is fairly simple. But it does require the presenter to have "a lot of experience to conduct the ideas sessions" with bankers, explains Wayne. Unlike in the past, when an architect went back to the drawing board after the first of several grueling "idea meetings," with this front-end technology "you have to think on your feet, and a lot of democracy is involved," Wayne notes.

At least one bank has taken this democracy straight to its branch managers. When Fleet Bank of Hartford, Conn., decided to move one of its branches to an abandoned bank across the street, it invited the branch manager of the location to be in on the design presentation meeting. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

It's a "Vision Thing." (Using Computer Aided Design to Plan Bank Facilities)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.