Football: How Tears Turned to Cheers for Magpies' Canadian Goal Hero; David Edgar Turned His Back on a Promising Ice Hockey Career in Canada to Play Football on Tyneside - and Newcastle United's Unlikely Goalscoring Hero Has Shed Plenty of Tears along the Way. Luke Edwards Reports

The Journal (Newcastle, England), January 3, 2007 | Go to article overview

Football: How Tears Turned to Cheers for Magpies' Canadian Goal Hero; David Edgar Turned His Back on a Promising Ice Hockey Career in Canada to Play Football on Tyneside - and Newcastle United's Unlikely Goalscoring Hero Has Shed Plenty of Tears along the Way. Luke Edwards Reports


Byline: Luke Edwards

DAVID Edgar had a dream. David Edgar wanted to be a professional footballer. David Edgar's parents thought he was mad. David Edgar's parents wanted him to play ice hockey.

Like most young Canadians, Edgar loved his country's national sport - which spawned such heroes as Wayne Gretzky - but he was in love with football, a minority sport which is not taken seriously in the land of the Maple leaf.

But Edgar was persistent and stubborn. His father Eddie had played professional football, including a single appearance for Newcastle United in the seventies, and his son wanted to emulate him.

When he was nine, Eddie, who runs a programme designed to give Canadian footballers the chance to play in Europe, took him to see Celtic, Manchester United and Newcastle train.

David was hooked, but the family would not leave their Canadian home in Kitchener, Ontario, and instead Eddie trained him - making him run for more than a kilometre to and from his indoor soccer school so that he could train for 40 minutes in his lunch hour

Through wind, rain and snow he trained until his father, encouraged by his son's determination as well as his talent, finally agreed to allow him to move to England.

"I always thought he was a better hockey player than he is a footballer," said Eddie, who was at St James's Park on Monday night to see his son score a dramatic equaliser against Manchester United. "I expected him to go into hockey.

But at 13 he told us he wanted to concentrate on football - but Canada is probably the worst country in the world for that. The development is horrendous.

"You have amateur coaches, amateur organisers and amateur leagues. So when he told me he wanted to play soccer, I didn't know what to do."

In the end, there was not much else he could do. His son was showing signs of promise and was adamant he wanted to play football.

So, at 14, he moved to England to live with his grandmother in Newcastle, where he was, with his father's help, spotted by scouts from Newcastle's Academy. "There were dozens of tearful phone calls," said his mother Christine. "It was very difficult because he's still my baby,"

But through the homesickness and tears, Edgar blossomed at Newcastle and, long before his debut on Boxing Day against Bolton, senior team-mates had singled him out as a player to watch for the future.

Glenn Roeder, who coached the 19-year-old when he was in charge of the Academy, had also seen signs that he could play in the Premiership, although he never thought he would have to so quickly.

In football, as in life, it is those who make the most of the opportunities which come their way who succeed and, as Roeder struggled with injuries to his senior squad, the kids have been given their chance far earlier than he envisaged. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Football: How Tears Turned to Cheers for Magpies' Canadian Goal Hero; David Edgar Turned His Back on a Promising Ice Hockey Career in Canada to Play Football on Tyneside - and Newcastle United's Unlikely Goalscoring Hero Has Shed Plenty of Tears along the Way. Luke Edwards Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.