Protect Social Security; Don't Let Illegals Raid the Trust Fund

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 5, 2007 | Go to article overview

Protect Social Security; Don't Let Illegals Raid the Trust Fund


Byline: Shannon Benton, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The 110th Congress convened yesterday with a new Democratic majority promising long-term solvency for Social Security.

It won't be easy.

According to the Social Security Trustees, our nation's Social Security Trust Funds are forecast to be completely exhausted by the year 2040 unless major changes to the system are implemented. But the crisis isn't waiting that long to arrive the system will have to start paying out more than it's taking in within a decade, and it's unclear where the money will come from.

Those in the Social Security policy world all point their finger to their favorite culprit some blame the absence of a Social Security lockbox, others the coming crush of baby-boomer retirees, while others choose the lack of will by some lawmakers to touch the "third rail" of American politics. Those factors do play a role, but for today, they're not the story.

Three and a half years ago, our organization submitted requests under the Freedom of Information Act to the Social Security Administration (SSA) and U.S. Department of State requesting a copy of and all costs associated with the U.S.-Mexico Social Security Totalization Agreement. The agreement is intended to eliminate dual taxation for people who work outside their country of origin.

Last week, the SSA finally relented a bit, and our organization became the first to see the agreement. The news isn't good.

We may be about to give away billions of dollars in Social Security money to millions of today's illegal Mexican workers.

At first glance, a law called the Social Security Protection Act of 2004 seems to prevent this giveaway from occurring, since it forbids illegal immigrants from claiming Social Security benefits. But a loophole in the law allows immigrants who gain valid "work authorized" Social Security numbers at some point to eventually file a claim for benefits. That means if an illegal worker becomes a citizen through guest-worker amnesty legislation or the totalization agreement, the government would use all earnings to calculate his or her retirement benefit including money made while working in the U.S. illegally.

The high cost of such a deal is of great concern. The Social Security Administration actuaries estimated the totalization agreement with Mexico would cost the U.S. Social Security system an average of just $105 million for each of the first five years significantly less than our existing agreement with Canada. However, when the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office (GAO) evaluated the SSA's estimates, it bluntly stated, "The cost of such an agreement is highly uncertain," and suggested that such a deal could cause a "measurable impact" on Social Security's trust funds.

Despite the GAO's three-year-old recommendation that the Social Security Administration improve cost estimates, no new estimate has been publicly released, and there is no evidence that the SSA has even conducted one. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Protect Social Security; Don't Let Illegals Raid the Trust Fund
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.