London Group Says Anti-Semitic, Racist Propaganda Spread through Computer Networks, Videos

By Jones, Arthur | National Catholic Reporter, July 29, 1994 | Go to article overview

London Group Says Anti-Semitic, Racist Propaganda Spread through Computer Networks, Videos


Jones, Arthur, National Catholic Reporter


WASHINGTON - Electronic fascism - the spread of anti-Semitic and racist propaganda through computer networks and other electronic wares such as computer disks and videocassettes - is the "growth area of |anti-Semitica'" in the 1990s, according to the London-based Institute of Jewish Affairs.

Much of the material is originated by U.S. neo-Nazi Gary Lauck and his National Socialist German Workers Party-Overseas Organization, according to the institute's 1994 Anti-Semitism World Report.

Further, the anti-Semitism making its way into world computer bulletin boards and electronic mailboxes, the institute states, is "more or less inaccessible to law-enforcement agencies." Barely present two years ago, "the distribution of racist and anti-Semitic computer games, videocassettes, racist telephone networks and hot lines, public-access television channels and radio programs" has mushroomed worldwide.

Examples of the developments, cited in the report:

* In Holland, police seized from more than 200 stores 10,000 computer games thought to have originated in the United States.

* Sweden has 15 to 20 active neo-Nazi computer bulletin boards.

* In Vienna, class presidents of two high schools received computer disks featuring propaganda "denying the existence of the gas chambers, trivializing the Holocaust or containing crude anti-Semitic attacks on Austrian politicians and journalists."

The 1994 report states that "rising intolerance and bigotry is linked to persistent economic and social problems; (and in Europe) the perceived influx of large numbers of immigrants and asylum seekers; the popularity of extreme nationalism; tension between ethnic groups; and the breakdown of traditional political structures and socially cohesive ideologies."

Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Britain, the United States and Sweden all reported an increase in anti-Semitic incidents.

The Institute of Jewish Affairs contends the far right throughout the world has become "part of mainstream political life and cannot be easily dismissed. …

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