Reports on the Twenty-First National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-06) Workshop Program

By Achtner, Wolfgang; Aimeur, Esma et al. | AI Magazine, Winter 2006 | Go to article overview

Reports on the Twenty-First National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-06) Workshop Program


Achtner, Wolfgang, Aimeur, Esma, Anand, Sarabjot Singh, Appelt, Doug, Ashish, Naveen, Barnes, Tiffany, Beck, Joseph E., Dias, M. Bernardine, Doshi, Prashant, Drummond, Chris, Elazmeh, William, Felner, Ariel, Freitag, Dayne, Geffner, Hector, Geib, Christopher W., Goodwin, Richard, Holte, Robert C., Hutter, Frank, Isaac, Fair, Japkowicz, Nathalie, Kaminka, Gal A., Koenig, Sven, Lagoudakis, Michail G., Leake, David, Lewis, Lundy, Liu, Hugo, Metzler, Ted, Mihalcea, Rada, Mobasher, Bamshad, Poupart, Pascal, Pynadath, David V., Roth-Berghofer, Thomas, Ruml, Wheeler, Schulz, Stefan, Schwarz, Sven, Seneff, Stephanie, Sheth, Amit, Sun, Ron, Thielscher, Michael, Upal, Afzal, Williams, Jason, Young, Steve, Zelenko, Dmitry, AI Magazine


* The Workshop program of the Twenty-First National Conference on Artificial Intelligence was held July 16-17, 2006 in Boston, Massachusetts. The program was chaired by Joyce Chai and Keith Decker. The titles of the 17 workshops were AI-Driven Technologies for Service-Oriented Computing; Auction Mechanisms for Robot Coordination; Cognitive Modeling and Agent-Based Social Simulations, Cognitive Robotics; Computational Aesthetics: Artificial Intelligence Approaches to Beauty and Happiness; Educational Data Mining; Evaluation Methods for Machine Learning; Event Extraction and Synthesis; Heuristic Search, Memory-Based Heuristics, and Their Applications; Human Implications Of Human-Robot Interaction; Intelligent Techniques in Web Personalization; Learning for Search; Modeling and Retrieval of Context; Modeling Others from Observations; and Statistical and Empirical Approaches for Spoken Dialogue Systems.

AAAI was pleased to present the AAAI-06 workshop program. Workshops were held Sunday and Monday, July 16-17, 2006, at the Seaport Hotel and World Trade Center in Boston, Massachusetts. The AAAI-06 workshop program included 14 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence. All but 2 of the workshops were held in a one-day timeslot. Each workshop was limited to approximately 25 to 75 participants. The 2006 workshop program was constructed to encourage dialogue and build bridges between researchers in different subfields. Several of the workshops were follow-ons from workshops held at more specialized AI conferences. Attendees were encouraged to attend and contribute to workshops that they were interested in even if they had no recent work directly in that area.

The titles of the 17 workshops were AI-Driven Technologies for Service-Oriented Computing; Auction Mechanisms for Robot Coordination; Cognitive Modeling and Agent-Based Social Simulations; Cognitive Robotics; Computational Aesthetics: Artificial Intelligence Approaches to Beauty and Happiness; Educational Data Mining; Evaluation Methods for Machine Learning; Event Extraction and Synthesis; Heuristic Search, Memory-Based Heuristics, and Their Applications; Human Implications of Human-Robot Interaction; Intelligent Techniques in Web Personalization; Learning for Search; Modeling and Retrieval of Context; Modeling Others from Observations; and Statistical and Empirical Approaches for Spoken Dialogue Systems.

AI Driven Technologies for Service-Oriented Computing

Service-oriented computing is an emerging computing paradigm for distributed systems that advocates web-based interfaces for the distributed business processes of any enterprise. The interfaces, called web services, hold the promise for diluting the traditional challenges of interoperability, inflexibility, and performance that have long plagued traditional distributed systems. Web services research represents an emerging application test bed with its own distinct challenges and presents an opportunity for M techniques to enter and affect this emerging area.

While somewhat similar workshops in the past have focused on the application of specific AI techniques in services-oriented computing, these did not bring together the broader AI community. The goal of this workshop was to investigate the application of a broad spectrum of AI techniques to services-oriented computing.

This full-day workshop featured 10 oral presentations and a 45-minute group discussion. All the selected papers were peer reviewed by members of the program committee. The speakers and participants represented several countries; diverse backgrounds that included academic, industrial, and defense agencies; and varying areas of expertise. The papers presented in the workshop addressed topics that included logics for reasoning about web services, symbolic and planning systems for composing web services, mixed initiative approaches for discovering and composing web services, and probabilistic techniques for adapting service compositions to dynamic environments. …

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