South Lake Tahoe: Heavenly Hike on the Tahoe Vista Trail

By Davidson, Ben | Sunset, August 1994 | Go to article overview

South Lake Tahoe: Heavenly Hike on the Tahoe Vista Trail


Davidson, Ben, Sunset


If the 8,250-foot elevation at the top of Heavenly Ski Resort's aerial tram doesn't make you dizzy, the wide-angle views of Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevada certainly will. And there's no better way to take in this mountain scenery than on a hike along the Tahoe Vista Trail, which starts from the top of the tram and traverses a mile of ridgeline above South Lake Tahoe, California. On clear days, the view from the trail stretches 30 miles or more.

After a 6-minute ride aboard the Swiss-built tram, you can make the hike with a guide trained by the Forest Service or on your own. The guided hikes, free and offered twice daily, focus on the natural history of the Lake Tahoe Basin. From start to finish, they take about 1 1/2 hours. Hikers meet on the sundeck of the Monument Peak Restaurant at 11 A.M. or 1 P.M. for a 10-minute video presentation covering the climate, geology, and foliage of the Tahoe Basin. The guided hikes follow. A free guide to the mile-long trail with information about 10 signed stops en route is available at the trailhead kiosk, just below the restaurant.

The hike is moderately strenuous, gaining 1,000 feet over the course of the trail. You'll pass stands of old-growth red fir and ponderosa and Jeffrey pine on the way to three vista points, where you can pause to listen to chickadees chirp, sniff the butterscotch scent of Jeffrey pine, and rest on benches and chairs cut from fallen timber. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

South Lake Tahoe: Heavenly Hike on the Tahoe Vista Trail
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.