TURN BACK THE CLOCK; Your Ultimate Guide to Cosmetic Treatments. Part One: The Face

Sunday Mirror (London, England), January 14, 2007 | Go to article overview

TURN BACK THE CLOCK; Your Ultimate Guide to Cosmetic Treatments. Part One: The Face


My facelift was a real eye-opener

BARBARA Hughes always thought her green eyes were her best feature. But when sales executive Barbara hit her 50s, they became hooded and puffy, so she decided to act.

In December 2005, the 56-year-old mum-of-one had a facelift. Barbara's surgeon at the Bristol Nuffield Hospital gave her blepharoplasty, a treatment which tightens and lifts droopy eyelids, and a cheek lift and brow lift - which took at least 15 years off her appearance. "The transformation has been incredible," says Barbara. "My jaw was starting to go square but now it's heart-shaped again. I enjoy applying my make-up again and being attractive to the opposite sex."

Divorcee Barbara, from Melksham, Wilts, says the pounds 8,900 treatment was worth every penny. "In my job it's very much a man's world. I saw the surgery as a way of looking the part and fitting into my environment. It's given me greater self-esteem and confidence."

COSMECEUTICAL CREAMS

Cost: pounds 28-pounds 700

COSMECEUTICAL is the new buzzword - it means moisturisers and cleansing products that have been formulated by specialist skin doctors.

Many can have an impact on superficial lines by boosting the production of new skin cells.

Lesley Reynolds, specialist skincare adviser at the Harley Street Medical Skin Clinic, says: "The difference between a cosmeceutical and a regular skin-care line is the concentration of the active ingredients. A cream you buy over the counter may contain very little of the active ingredient. A good cosmeceutical has been formulated for skin doctors."

Ingredients to look for include antioxidants, Vitamin C to improve skin tone and brightness' glycolic acid to remove dead cells' agireline to relax muscles and reduce fine lines and wrinkles' AHAs (fruit acids) to deliver the powerful ingredients to the lower skin layers' growth peptides to turbo-charge the production of new skin and DMAE from fish oils to tighten.

TRY THESE -DERMATOLOGIC Cosmetic Laboratories - US range with excellent clinical trials behind their anti-ageing claims. COST From pounds 25-85. Call 0845 634 0510 for your nearest clinic.

MEDIK8'S Pretox 3HTP Muscle Relaxant Gel claims to gently reduce facial muscle movements to smooth frown and crow'sfeet lines - a no-needle alternative to Botox. COST pounds 77 from Beautyflash. Call 0870 200 0949.

DDF products were the first cosmeceuticals launched in the UK. Their extensive range includes Wrinkle Relax, the firstever Botox in a bottle. COST From pounds 28-196. Call 0800 0376000 for details of your nearest stockist.

TOP TIP

THESE creams should only be bought after consultation with a dermatologist or a trained skin-care specialist. The ingredients can cause irritation if they're not used correctly.

CHEMICAL SKIN PEELS

Cost: pounds 50-pounds 1,500

FOR an instantly fresher face all over, you can't beat a facial peel. They come in three types:

SUPERFICIAL PEEL: This is the removal of the outer layers of skin known as the epidermis recommended for rough, dry dull skin. Try: A gentle glycolic acid peel which gives a polished result - you can pop to a beauty clinic and go straight back to work and no one will be any the wiser. COST: pounds 50-pounds 100 from the Harley Street Medical Skin Clinic, 020 7935 0986, or go online to www.consultingroom.com for clinics nationally.

MEDIUM DEPTH PEEL: Works down to the upper dermal layers and and can reduce deeper expression lines. One common ingredient is tricholoroacetic acid. Performed only by a trained dematologist, this treatment will leave your face red and possibly sore for a few days. The results? A pinker, brighter skin tone that can last up to three months. COST: pounds 500. Try: L-TCA Peel from Renew Medica in London. Call 0800 027 2029.

DEEP PEEL: This can help patients with deep furrows or scarring. …

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