Banking the Unbanked on Both Sides of the Border: The Federal Reserve Banks and Their Central Bank Counterpart in Mexico, Banco De Mexico, Continue to Innovate as They Refine Their Cross-Border Ach Payments Services in Response to the Needs and Desires of the Mexican Remittance Market

By Whisler, Elena | Partners in Community and Economic Development, Winter 2006 | Go to article overview

Banking the Unbanked on Both Sides of the Border: The Federal Reserve Banks and Their Central Bank Counterpart in Mexico, Banco De Mexico, Continue to Innovate as They Refine Their Cross-Border Ach Payments Services in Response to the Needs and Desires of the Mexican Remittance Market


Whisler, Elena, Partners in Community and Economic Development


In mid-2005, the Federal Reserve Banks and Banco de launched Directo a Mexico [SM], a campaign to spread the word about the benefits of using the FedACH International [R] Mexico Service for cross-border payments. Thanks to promotional events and user-friendly marketing materials, Directo a Mexico is now widely known as an efficient payments system that makes it possible for U.S. financial institutions to provide reliable ACH service to Mexico for their customers.

Not only is Directo a Mexico committed to low fees and next-day clearing of payments, but the program also provides foreign exchange rate conversions at highly competitive rates. This service has helped U.S. banks and credit unions increase their historically small share of the rapidly growing U.S.-to-Mexico remittance market.

Nevertheless, banks and credit unions still fend it difficult to attract the many customers who would benefit front sending remittance payments through Directo a Mexico. An account-to-account transfer, Direeto a Mexico requires that both the sender and beneficiary (recipient) maintain accounts at financial institutions. Because the majority of those sending money to Mexico (or receiving it) do not have bank accounts, they do not participate. Estimates show that only about five percent of remittances are sent to and front bank accounts.

New Fed partnership gets the unbanked on board

In an effort to help bank the unbanked on both sides of the border, the Federal Reserve Banks and Banco de Mexico have collaborated with Banco del Ahorro Nacional y Servicios Financieros, S.N.C, commonly known as Bansefi, a government-owned development bank in Mexico. Through this new relationship, Bansefi and the Federal Reserve Banks have created an innovative internet tool, the Beneficiary Account Registration (BAR) website, which provides access to formal financial services as well as low-cost delivery of money transfers from the United States.

The BAR website, owned and managed by Bansefi, allows banks and credit unions in the U.S. to pre-open an account for a third-party beneficiary in Mexico (who will receive the remittance transfer) at any Bansefi branch throughout Mexico. Through this service, which is available to any financial institution enrolled in Directo a Mexico, users with passwords can access the BAR website to register the beneficiary. The registration process generates a CLABE (Clave Bancaria Estandarizada)--a unique, 18-digit number designated to identify each bank account in Mexico--which can be used immediately by the financial institution to send a money transfer via Directo a Mexico.

To formalize the account and withdraw the funds, the beneficiary needs only to go to the designated Bansefi branch in Mexico with proper identification. …

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Banking the Unbanked on Both Sides of the Border: The Federal Reserve Banks and Their Central Bank Counterpart in Mexico, Banco De Mexico, Continue to Innovate as They Refine Their Cross-Border Ach Payments Services in Response to the Needs and Desires of the Mexican Remittance Market
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