Special Education Teachers' Attitudes toward Autistic Students in the Autism School in the State of Kuwait: A Case Study

By Al-Shammari, Zaid | Journal of Instructional Psychology, September 2006 | Go to article overview

Special Education Teachers' Attitudes toward Autistic Students in the Autism School in the State of Kuwait: A Case Study


Al-Shammari, Zaid, Journal of Instructional Psychology


In this study, the purpose was to examine Kuwaiti special education teachers' attitudes toward autistic students in the Autism School in Kuwait. This research study is divided into two parts: Introduction (the problem statement, the purpose statement, the research questions, definition of terms), and Procedures (using a case study in research, the role of the researcher, data collection procedures, methods for verification, outcome of the study and relation to theory and the literature). The researcher analyzed data from interviews of two special education teachers who work in the Autism School in Kuwait.

**********

The Autism School was established in 1999 in the State of Kuwait (Kuwait) for children with autism. This school provides the appropriate educational programs for autistic children who depend on individualized learning settings and goals. Teachers try to give children the skills needed so that they can survive in society once they leave the school (KMOE, 2001). Currently, there are twenty boys enrolled in this school. This research study investigates special education teachers' attitudes toward autistic students within the Autism School in Kuwait.

Statement of the Problem

Because of the lack of the research on autism in Kuwait and in particular among school-aged children, this study is of significant importance. The researcher focused on special education teachers who work directly with autistic children in the Autism School in Kuwait. Currently the Kuwaiti universities which prepare future teachers lack courses and curricula to help pre-service and in-service special teachers understand issues related to autism. Teachers, therefore, may be ill-prepared to teach students with autism in Kuwait.

Statement of the Purpose

This research study has three goals: (1) to discover Kuwaiti special education teachers' attitudes toward students with autism, (2) to update and educate Kuwaiti special education teachers with regard to autism, (3) to suggest recommendations for the future. All three purposes of the study are discussed in detail in the following paragraphs.

First, this research study addresses selected special education teachers' attitudes in the Autism School in Kuwait to learn about their opinions towards students with autism.

Second, this research study updates the existing literature concerning students with autism in the field of special education in Kuwait and gives information for all Kuwaiti special education teachers, university faculties, and policy makers in the Kuwait Ministry of Education.

Third, if recommendations of this research study are approved by the Kuwait Ministry of Education, then all Kuwaiti universities will improve their education curricula to include special education programs for in-service and pre-service teachers who plan to work with students with autism. It is the researcher's hope that Kuwait will develop and improve its special education programs regarding autism as a result of this study and its recommendations.

The Grand Tour Question and Sub-questions

In order to answer the statement of the problem, the following open ended questions need to be addressed to teachers in the Autism School:

1. What is your overall feeling toward students with autism in your school?

2. What do you think affects your attitude towards students with autism?

3. What subject or skills do you teach students with autism in the Autism School?

Definitions

The following four terms are used in this research study: (1) the Autism School, (2) attitude, (3) a case study, (4) and students with autism. All terms are defined below.

Kuwait Autism School:

A school for autism was established in 1999 in Kuwait to provide special educational programs for children with autism in an individual learning environment with individual goals that meet their needs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Special Education Teachers' Attitudes toward Autistic Students in the Autism School in the State of Kuwait: A Case Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.