The Philippine Philosophy E-Group

Manila Bulletin, January 20, 2007 | Go to article overview

The Philippine Philosophy E-Group


Byline: Florangel Rosario Braid

THIS new e-group created by Rai Ibana, the lead convenor of a project on a Philosophy for Education has now over 20 members. Rai explains the history of this Project which started with Mario Taguiwalo who noted that the philosophy of education has not been tackled recently in the various forums the national level. The diverse ideas regarding directions have never been brought to a common table for discussion. There are many scientific findings on social and human development and these need to be reviewed for their possible impact on a philosophy of education. Those of us who had been involved in the initial discussions contributed ideas, some of which I had documented in an earlier column for the purpose of inviting critical comment. I am therefore pleased that Mario who to many of us in education, media, health, and even politics, is a well respected "guru" or "spiritual leader" had raised several valid points intended to advance the discussion.

Which is really the aim of an e-group like the PPE21C@yahoogroups.com -- to encourage what he describes as "more disciplined thinking about meaning, implications and consequences of the facts." He started by questioning the feasibility of a national philosophy of education -- that even if it is feasible, he is not sure whether it is useful or desirable. Even in countries with a national philosophy, there is further need to inquire how these philosophies emerge, their practical consequences, and influence, he notes. On the functionality of education (which I noted appears to be the main goal of the present educational system), he provided these reflections.

"This is unavoidable if education were to engage the interest and energies of people and that there is doubt whether this by itself is harmful or undesirable. Maybe, the question we should be posing is this: Are Filipinos pursuing the correct practical benefits from education, given their underlying and life long aspirations? Is education providing the means to answer this question for themselves? …

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