The Magnificent Anderson

The Evening Standard (London, England), January 19, 2007 | Go to article overview

The Magnificent Anderson


Byline: ANNABEL RIVKIN

Since Gillian Anderson moved to London, she's got married and divorced, secured a BAFTA nomination and had a new baby with a new man. As her political thriller, The Last King of Scotland, garners praise, she talks to Annabel Rivkin about her unconventional life

Gillian Anderson speaks slowly. Her three-month-old son Oscar was awake until 4.30 this morning, 'and that's not normal,' she says, calm but bleary.

'The thing is, I moved house at the same time as he was born so I started from a place of tiredness.' She was meant to move with her boyfriend, businessman Mark Griffiths, and her 12-year-old daughter Piper, a good month before Oscar was born but he decided to come early. 'He was 6lb 8oz, which is a decent weight,' she says, 'but he had a lot of fluid on his lungs and so he was quite tubed up and was in intensive care, and I couldn't pick him up. But we got to take him home [from The Portland] after a week so we were actually very lucky.' Anderson became famous 14 years ago when she embarked on a ten-year stint playing Dana Scully on The X Files and, over the past year, there had been much speculation over the circumstances surrounding her pregnancy. It was widely reported that Anderson's marriage to the former journalist and now bio-fuel entrepreneur Julian Ozanne officially ended only after she became pregnant by Griffiths. She declines to comment except to say that she finds it highly offensive when people assume she is only in her current relationship with Griffiths because she 'fell' pregnant and that the reported dates are inaccurate.

Married to Ozanne for 16 months but with him for three years, she suffered both a miscarriage and an ectopic pregnancy. 'So after you've had that, you don't say, "Oh, I'm pregnant but I won't take this one, it's not convenient, I'll take the next one."' She had wanted a second child - she had Piper with her first husband Clyde Klotz, an art director on The X Files - for some time but she's not entirely blinded by her own happy situation and acknowledges with a discreet nod that her ex-husband must find this entire episode very painful. 'I wouldn't have planned it this way,' she says. 'I wouldn't have wished it this way but it happened and at 38... Complicated but, at the same time, 38. There was no question. It shocked a couple of people, but the ones who really know me and who have known my history over the past couple of years, well, they also know when I'm sane and when I'm not sane. And me being sane and pregnant was a much better recipe for their friend than me being not sane and not pregnant.' One journalist likened an interview with Anderson to wrestling with a crocodile and she has certainly been vocal on press intrusion, but when I first meet her she's eight months pregnant, round yet compact in a tight black dress, and I find her terribly kind and very good company, even if she does put it down to a hormonal flood that is allowing her to 'float above anything'. Even though she was voted sexiest woman in the world many times during The X Files years, and had more than 9,000 websites devoted to her redhaired charms - it was dyed, she's a blonde - it wasn't until her luminously miserable, virtuoso performance as Lady Dedlock, in the Andrew Davies adaptation of Bleak House, that her bone structure and poise began to read properly.

During her ten years on 'The Series', as she refers to The X Files, the producers had a habit of dressing her in dowdy trouser suits; not that this deterred her devoted fanbase. The costume designers even managed to disguise her first pregnancy with lab coats and eventually an alien abduction. 'Most of the time I look like shit,' she says merrily. 'I mean, I don't brush my hair and half the time I don't look in the mirror before I leave the house and at the moment I own three things that fit.' Indeed she is no Victoria Beckham when it comes to dressing up to go shopping and her red-carpet outfits do not lead one to believe that she sets much store by stylists, yet her face is getting better and better. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Magnificent Anderson
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.