Pedal, Jog, Roll or Trot: Happy Rail Trails to You

By Capitano, Laura | The Florida Times Union, January 5, 2007 | Go to article overview

Pedal, Jog, Roll or Trot: Happy Rail Trails to You


Capitano, Laura, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Laura Capitano

Reason No. 42 to love Jacksonville: Even during the coldest months, we still get mild, sunny days ideal for a romp in the great outdoors. And because I know there's a post-holiday influx of shiny, new bikes out there, why not strap a couple to the back of your car and head to the Jacksonville-Baldwin Rail Trail for a dose of fresh air and exercise?

Or you can bring your Rollerblades, skateboard or just your jogging shoes - any mobility enhancer will do. You can even bring your horse to explore the equestrian path. Now, where did I leave that darn pony?

I chose to pedal along this smooth, 14.5-mile asphalt path that winds through the pines and palmettos where a CSX railway line used to run. Rails-to-Trails Conservancy is the organization behind paths like these. They work with communities nationwide to transform defunct rail lines into pedestrian trails.

Taking off from the Imeson Road Trailhead on the Jacksonville end of the path, the initial scenery is fairly residential. The path is tree-lined but the foliage is thin early on, and the sizzle of the power lines and distant traffic whoosh is more audible. You pass suburban homes with Georgia Bulldogs flags flapping, and children playing in backyards call out their hellos and wave to passers-by.

You see less and less brick and concrete as you ease on down the trail. Farm country rolls in. You notice pine tree and subtle barnyard smells. Cows and horses lounge in their pastures, roosters crow, and you even pass the sharp barks and whipping tails of a greyhound farm.

Other than animal chatter, you don't hear much else at the heart of the trail. It's a kind of peace we just don't get in the city, and the ride is ideal for clear thought and personal reflection. Consider leaving your iPod at home at least once. Have yourself a "silence is golden" moment. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Pedal, Jog, Roll or Trot: Happy Rail Trails to You
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.