Dear Diary, What Became of Secrets?

By Capitano, Laura | The Florida Times Union, January 14, 2007 | Go to article overview

Dear Diary, What Became of Secrets?


Capitano, Laura, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Laura Capitano

I came of age in the diary era. 'Twas a time when young girls kept hard-bound books, often with Hello Kitty or unicorns on their covers, in which they detailed the thoughts and activities they preferred to keep secret. Those confessions of love, hate, doom and glory were sure to be secure in Dear Diary and its trusty lock.

We've high-sped to the Internet era, one admittedly not as quaint-sounding as its predecessor. What I would consider Dear Diary information is the text and photos of MySpace and Facebook pages and personal blogs. With just a few clicks, anyone can view "The Top 50 Reasons Why Kevin Sux," the passed-out-in-the-bathtub pictures, shots of tattoos on what should be private body parts, weepy break-up sagas, "Gawd! I Hate My Mom" rants, same sex and opposite sex make-out photos, and details, details, details about crushes, sexual conquests, insecurities and aspirations.

It's as if having secrets has gone out of style.

Whether this should-be classified information is posted by the person it pertains to or by an online "friend" in a comment or reply doesn't really matter. The fact that it's routinely posted at all is what's revealing. Our reckless youth are cool and comfortable with their lives being an open book. A book open to a MySpace page, with plenty of cyberspace to self-promote.

When a young person's goal is satisfying his overblown need for affiliation, keeping secrets and maintaining privacy don't help the mission. Having a kickin' page or a thrilling blog is perceived as evidence of social accomplishment.

How great to be young and have an easy platform to present a life rich with drama. To filter out all the dull and boring in your life and highlight your hottest photos and most witty commentary. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dear Diary, What Became of Secrets?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.