Academic Repression

Radical Teacher, Winter 2006 | Go to article overview

Academic Repression


A number of professors have been detained, arrested, or otherwise harassed in America's wars on Iraq and terror. Professor Ghazi-Walid Falah, Associate Professor of Geography at the University of Akron, was arrested in Israel on July 8, 2006. Professor Tariq Ramadam was denied a visa under a key provision of the Patriot Act (http://www.aaup.org).

A battle is underway on campuses over what can or cannot be said about the Middle East and U.S. foreign policy. Douglas Giles, a professor of Philosophy and Religion at Roosevelt University in Chicago, was fired after being ordered by his department head not to allow students to ask questions about Palestine and Israel or to mention anything that could possibly open Judaism to criticism (The Observer, August 13, 2006). Also see "Dark Days in Academe" at http://groups.yahoo. com/group/foracademicfreedom.

John Milos, Associate Professor of Political Economy at the National Technical University of Athens, was expecting to speak on a panel called "Class and the Distribution of Income in the United States" at SUNY Stony Brook's "How Class Works" in June, 2006. Instead, he was held at Kennedy Airport, questioned for hours, and ultimately sent back to Greece by federal authorities (Inside Higher Ed, June 21, 2006).

The Latin American Studies Association moved its 2007 congress from Boston to Montreal, in protest of the U.S. government's repeated denial of visas to Cuban scholars (58 so far in 2006) invited to participate in earlier congresses. …

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