Libraries Say a Loud Please as They Start a Campaign for New Readers

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), January 29, 2007 | Go to article overview

Libraries Say a Loud Please as They Start a Campaign for New Readers


Byline: By Paul Rowland Western Mail

The campaign to rekindle Wales' love affair with libraries kicks off today. More people use libraries in Wales than the rest of Britain, but numbers are declining. And their reputation for being archaic, dusty and uninviting is part of the reason. The scheme comes amid a decline in the numbers of people regularly using libraries, as multi- media advances take their toll on demand for their services. Visitor numbers have halved over the past two decades, with the figures for the number of books issued showing an even greater drop.

The latest campaign aims to reverse that trend by raising awareness of the facilities available at most local libraries.

The Assembly Government has also pledged to provide an extra pounds 2.5m next year towards improving the Welsh library network, after it was revealed last year that none of the local authorities in Wales were meeting the standards for library services set in 2002.

Last year's figures showed an improvement in the number of authorities spending target levels on books and other materials, but revealed 13 out of 22 still weren't reaching expected standards.

It is now hoped that a campaign will raise the profile of library services, alongside a campaign to improve standards inside Wales' ageing library buildings.

The initiative will focus on the evolution of public libraries in Wales, with the intention of shedding their image as shabby old buildings and emphasise the investment in new technology and the multimedia facilities on offer.

Recent figures have also shown major improvements in visitor numbers in libraries that have benefited from refurbishments.

An pounds 80,000 investment in refurbishing Oystermouth Library in 2005 resulted in a 31% increase in visits in the first year, alongside a 38% rise in requests, and book issues going up by 24%.

Children's book issues increased by 42% in the same period, and books issued to children under five increased by 102%.

The campaign will also see:

A nationwide marketing campaign aimed at changing the traditional image of libraries as quiet, dusty places which only stock historical romances;

Further investment in computer technology for Welsh libraries, particularly to improve online access to libraries;

Greater emphasis on co-operation between public and educational bodies to widen access to library resources;

More attention given to ensuring library staff have the appropriate skills to help users.

The scheme is being launched today at the Whiterose Information Resource Centre in New Tredegar, in Caerphilly, where research suggests 63% of the population regularly use a public library - one of the highest figures in Wales.

The Assembly Government- funded scheme will then tour libraries around Wales to encourage more use among a generation with a stronger affinity to games consoles and the internet, than short-loan paperbacks. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Libraries Say a Loud Please as They Start a Campaign for New Readers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.