200 Cities Set to Observe Season for Nonviolence

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), January 27, 2007 | Go to article overview

200 Cities Set to Observe Season for Nonviolence


Byline: FROM HEART TO HEART By Two Rivers Interfaith Ministries Board For The Register-Guard

A Season for Nonviolence, Jan. 30 through April 4, is a 64-day spiritual, educational, grass-roots campaign dedicated to demonstrating that nonviolence is a powerful way to heal, transform and empower our lives and our communities.

This international event honors the visions held by Mahatma Gandhi and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. for a just, nonviolent and peace-loving world.

A Season for Nonviolence was seeded in 1998 and now draws substantial activity in more than 200 cities in 40 states and 10 countries. Fifty percent of our U.S. governors, and many mayors, issue official proclamations for the 64-day period, and more than 300 events and programs have been developed and carried out at the local level during the season. At least 350 major peace organizations and religious, business, arts and learning institutions have elected to co-sponsor the Season for Nonviolence initiative.

Inspired by activities in other cities related to this theme, the Two Rivers Interfaith Ministries Board has made the commitment to support the vision of these inspirational leaders and those who have followed in their footsteps by providing community-wide activities throughout the 64-day period this year.

Nonviolence is not passive acquiescence to hurtful behavior, but a proactive attempt to address the hurt that produces the behavior. It is a realization that all parties to a conflict possess a share of the truth and that the goal is for each truth to illuminate the other rather than triumph over the other.

For that reason, nonviolence creates safe ways to express feelings and beliefs, and works at solving problems peacefully by encouraging communication, understanding and cooperation.

As the world scene continues to heat up with violence as its response to global pressures, the call to radically and fundamentally transform our consciousness beckons. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

200 Cities Set to Observe Season for Nonviolence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.