New Hampshire before New Year's? the Front-Loading of Primaries-Meant to Help Pick a Nominee Quickly-May Backfire

By Alter, Jonathan | Newsweek, February 5, 2007 | Go to article overview

New Hampshire before New Year's? the Front-Loading of Primaries-Meant to Help Pick a Nominee Quickly-May Backfire


Alter, Jonathan, Newsweek


Byline: Jonathan Alter

I saw Mayor Richard Daley of Chicago last week, and he used a political term from the past: "Favorite son." Until the '60s, local party leaders would often keep their powder dry before a nominating convention by pledging their delegates to a senator or governor from their state. Occasionally, one of these favorite sons--like Illinois Gov. Adlai Stevenson in 1952--would win the nomination; more often, their delegates became bargaining chips. Daley was explaining why he's backing Barack Obama. Illinois officials are rallying behind him, just as New York has united around Hillary Clinton.

Could this be an omen? A convention instead of a coronation has been the dream of political reporters for a generation. It's still highly unlikely. But no incumbents are running in either party, and the new, yet-to-be-determined primary schedule scrambles old assumptions.

Anyone who claims they know how this will go is blowing smoke. Polls don't help much. A Clinton adviser, who didn't want to be named speculating, told me he thought Hillary might fall behind Obama--then rally as a compelling underdog. An adviser to John McCain, unnamed for the same reason, is worried about Sam Brownback (currently at 1 percent in the polls). There's widespread concern that the front-loading of primaries--meant to help parties settle on a nominee quickly--may backfire. "You can make the case that it will mean an earlier nominee--or a later nominee," says Howard Wolfson, Hillary's spokesman. "The law of unintended consequences means that what we think we know, we don't know."

All we know for sure is that New Hampshire is determined to maintain its tradition of holding the first-in-the-nation primary, even if it means voting this Christmas, and that Iowa and Nevada will hold their caucuses before New Hampshire votes. (Thanksgiving, anyone?) Most likely, all three, plus South Carolina, will hold their contests in January.

Big-state governors like Arnold Schwarzenegger in California and Jon Corzine in New Jersey are trying to move their primaries from late spring all the way up to Feb. 5, with Illinois and Florida expected to join them. With the old tradition of winner-take-all primaries gone, the parties could face a situation where the vast majority of delegates are chosen by late March, but no candidate has it sewn up. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Hampshire before New Year's? the Front-Loading of Primaries-Meant to Help Pick a Nominee Quickly-May Backfire
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.