'Salt Marsh Soldiers' Clean Up, Study and Promote Wetlands; It's a Project for Biology Students at the Glynn County Grade 8.5 Center

By Stepzinski, Teresa | The Florida Times Union, January 22, 2007 | Go to article overview

'Salt Marsh Soldiers' Clean Up, Study and Promote Wetlands; It's a Project for Biology Students at the Glynn County Grade 8.5 Center


Stepzinski, Teresa, The Florida Times Union


Byline: TERESA STEPZINSKI

BRUNSWICK - The Salt Marsh Soldiers gathered around as Vicki Klahn recently scratched their plan of attack in the gravel at their feet.

Their mission, Klahn explained, was straightforward.

"We're going to adopt this section of wetlands," said Klahn, who pointed to the nearby bank along the East Brunswick River and Academy Creek that was strewn with trash and debris, ranging from empty beer bottles and greasy burger wrappers to water-logged timbers from an old dock.

"Remember, if you see anything broken, don't touch it ... If you see an animal, just stop and watch it. Don't go near it," Klahn said to the "soldiers" - her biology students at the Glynn County School System's Grade 8.5 Center.

The students, who have named themselves Salt Marsh Soldiers, have adopted that section of wetland as part of a research project that emphasizes hands-on learning and public service.

Klahn, a teacher for six years, developed the project, which has three main components.

First, the students are adopting a section of wetland to clean up and monitor for environmental quality. They will collect water samples that will be analyzed to determine the biological and chemical content.

Second, they are creating two mosaic murals depicting plants and animals in the salt-marsh ecosystem. Wood salvaged from the marsh is being crafted by the students into a frame for the murals that will be entered in an upcoming statewide youth environmental competition. In addition, they will create a three-dimensional artwork using glass bottles collected at the site that can't be recycled.

Third, the students each will select a marsh animal or plant to research. That research requires the students to write a comprehensive paper and prepare a presentation using computers or some other form of technology.

"I'm doing spartina grass because everything runs on grass in the marsh," said Anqunette Williams, who also plans to research the periwinkle, a snail common to the salt marsh.

Students have also launched a paper recycling program at the school, Klahn said.

COMMUNITY IMPACT

The project's impact will extend beyond the classroom, Mayor Bryan Thompson said.

"These students are setting a really great example for everyone," Thompson said. "They are doing hands-on environmental biology, and by cleaning up the area they are doing a great service."

The area has evolved into an illegal dumping ground for trash and garbage. Flotsam, such as wooded planks from docks shattered by storms, litter the marsh.

However, it's also a popular fishing and crabbing site for Brunswick residents.

"What the students are doing there to make it better, is deeply appreciated. ... There is nothing too small that can be done, even if it's just picking up one piece of litter," Thompson said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'Salt Marsh Soldiers' Clean Up, Study and Promote Wetlands; It's a Project for Biology Students at the Glynn County Grade 8.5 Center
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.